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Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
#1

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
https://pdf.sciencedirectassets.com/2725...ype=client

This is a paper written on the practice. It is actually an old practice, from way back. It turns cows from a climate change issue to a climate change solution. I for one would love to see this widely implemented, I would pay extra for steaks and Hamburger from cows like that. 

It's not about what the cows do, it's all about what we do with the cows.

An easier to read summary: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar...9721004710
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#2

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
I read where young cattle are being trained to urinate in a shed that captures the urine. Urine in soil can be polluting.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/sep-18-t...0aquifers.
If you get to thinking you’re a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else’s dog around.
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#3

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-03-2023, 09:42 PM)Fireball Wrote: I read where young cattle are being trained to urinate in a shed that captures the urine. Urine in soil can be polluting.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/sep-18-t...0aquifers.

Cows are very trainable. They can learn easily to go to certain locations at certain times. In the US, the cowboy macho thing totally ruined proper keeping of cows.
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#4

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
No explanation offered or apology proffered:

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#5

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-03-2023, 11:37 PM)Dom Wrote:
(07-03-2023, 09:42 PM)Fireball Wrote: I read where young cattle are being trained to urinate in a shed that captures the urine. Urine in soil can be polluting.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/sep-18-t...0aquifers.

Cows are very trainable. They can learn easily to go to certain locations at certain times. In the US, the cowboy macho thing totally ruined proper keeping of cows.



Dogs can herd cows.  And sheep.




And they don't have to go into town on Saturday night and get drunk, either!
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#6

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-04-2023, 04:34 PM)Minimalist Wrote:
(07-03-2023, 11:37 PM)Dom Wrote: Cows are very trainable. They can learn easily to go to certain locations at certain times. In the US, the cowboy macho thing totally ruined proper keeping of cows.



Dogs can herd cows.  And sheep.




And they don't have to go into town on Saturday night and get drunk, either!

Cows do not need to be herded - ever. Unless they have been scared to shits by idiotic humans. They are good learners, they will behave better than dogs, you can let them out on the morning and they come back into their precise personal milking stalls when it's time. The cows in Austria walked some 30 miles uphill to their summer grazing areas. Unsupervised. I don't know if sheep need it, maybe so. But cows - they are as trainable as dogs, and you only need to train one, put a bell on it, and all the others will just follow.  Cows are so misunderstood. It's all because of those cowboy legends I think.
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#7

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
It does take some work to move them from paddock to paddock if you're going to use this system. There's the option of a spider fence too..also some work moving it with the cattle in it. Of the two, I prefer the latter. No need to bait them or hope they follow some trained cow you don't have. Less investment and maintenance on fencing, too.

If you're really moving them (as in often, because you have a small property or relatively meager forage or you want to build for a season), they're not going to be super motivated to move because from their point of view there's still alot of great forage right where they are. A stubborn cow or two can eat into your day.

There are multiple versions of this for pastured chicken, too. You can go from 50 an acre to 500 an acre, if you have a plan for pulling out all the excess nitrogen and aren't worried about the salt buildup. They still need supplemental feeding, though, as opposed to cattle..which would not.

I've seen good results using this method with a cattle to chicken to pig to cover to crop to cattle rotation. Really cuts down on tillage and pest control. Anecdotally, less excess mortality as well. Everything is healthier, and happier.
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#8

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-04-2023, 06:43 PM)Dom Wrote: [

Cows do not need to be herded - ever. Unless they have been scared to shits by idiotic humans. They are good learners, they will behave better than dogs, you can let them out on the morning and they come back into their precise personal milking stalls when it's time. The cows in Austria walked some 30 miles uphill to their summer grazing areas. Unsupervised. I don't know if sheep need it, maybe so. But cows - they are as trainable as dogs, and you only need to train one, put a bell on it, and all the others will just follow.  Cows are so misunderstood. It's all because of those cowboy legends I think.

Most cattle drives in westerns were to the slaughter house, a one-time, one-way trip.  Consider
“Religion is excellent stuff for keeping common people quiet. 
Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich.”
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#9

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
Which might explain why they needed to be driven, lol.

I fear that this is going to be so boring to anyone who wasn't there, but cattle drives...were a consequence of the invention of barbed wire. You didn't have to drive them before you needed to navigate lethal obstacles. The conflict between a cattle culture driving stock to industrial slaughter and a speculative real estate culture preventing those drives with barbed obstacles gave birth to the american present.

The real estate agents won, if there was any ambiguity on how that panned out.

I remember the last floridian cattle drive. They did it to celebrate the end of the cracker cattleman, and the beginning of the gulf-atlantic land corridor (through I-4). To a certain extent, it drove me into the service, as the life I'd been raised to live no longer existed and the skills I had only led to one other career. To this day, I won't touch or ride (or feed) a horse. They look like glue and canned meat...to me. There's literally no other job that needs to understand moving mammals and equipment through vast swampland, except for the army's para sf. The funny thing, is that I can't stand cattle. I don't trust them. They have their own fucking ideas and their own private lives and that's exactly -not- what I want to deal with if the task is to make some coin. Especially if they're bigger than me. Fuck......that...and fuck them. I have alot...alot of experience with multi paddock rotational grazing - long before salatins law of the first bite™ or this new repackaging as a conventional method, but I'm pretty much the last guy any of my ranching buddies call to move fences...because I just have one solution to any problem in that system - and it's to kill the offending cow immediately on principle. It's a great way to "train" the others...and young beef is so much better than "finished" beef. Anytime I get invited they're basically agreeing to a cookout.
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#10

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-05-2023, 07:17 PM)Rhythmcs Wrote: Which might explain why they needed to be driven, lol.  

I fear that this is going to be so boring to anyone who wasn't there, but cattle drives...were a consequence of the invention of barbed wire.  You didn't have to drive them before you needed to navigate lethal obstacles.  The conflict between a cattle culture driving stock to industrial slaughter and a speculative real estate culture preventing those drives with barbed obstacles gave birth to the american present.

The real estate agents won, if there was any ambiguity on how that panned out.

I remember the last floridian cattle drive.  They did it to celebrate the end of the cracker cattleman, and the beginning of the gulf-atlantic land corridor (through I-4).  To a certain extent, it drove me into the service, as the life I'd been raised to live no longer existed and the skills I had only led to one other career.  To this day, I won't touch or ride (or feed) a horse.  They look like glue and canned meat...to me.  There's literally no other job that needs to understand moving mammals and equipment through vast swampland, except for the army's para sf.  The funny thing, is that I can't stand cattle.  I don't trust them.  They have their own fucking ideas and their own private lives and that's exactly -not- what I want to deal with if the task is to make some coin.  Especially if they're bigger than me.  Fuck......that...and fuck them. I have alot...alot of experience with multi paddock rotational grazing - long before salatins law of the first bite™ or this new repackaging as a conventional method, but I'm pretty much the last guy any of my ranching buddies call to move fences...because I just have one solution to any problem in that system - and it's to kill the offending cow immediately on principle.  It's a great way to "train" the others...and young beef is so much better than "finished" beef.  Anytime I get invited they're basically agreeing to a cookout.

I’m not sure I understood everything you said here but I liked the way you said it!
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#11

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
My wife and aunt and I got in the middle of a drive in NE California on one of our trips. It was delightful. Some people might be in too much of a hurry to appreciate it but we are not those folks.
We had driven northeast from Lake Tahoe to Gerlach, the home of Burning Man. Then we wandered over to Eagleville our rendezvous with the cattle and cowboys.
I grew up with a few dairy cows that my mom milked for the neighborhood, but she went back to work and I had the small dairy across the street to watch for entertainment. They are a fine example of how trainable cattle are, and how curious. Dad used to open an umbrella to prove that. The girls would be at our fence in a few minutes to see what that was all about. Any number of unusual actions would bring them over for a look-see.
I became really allergic to all the fabulous feeds for cattle and horses and thereby lost any interest in them.
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#12

Adaptive multi-paddock grazing
(07-04-2023, 02:54 AM)Inkubus Wrote: No explanation offered or apology proffered:


I thank you for this earworm mate!         Big Grin

Also...



Priceless:    "Hold please...  Holly, left panty, crotch down a little bit more okay".

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