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Feral Cat Clinic
#26

Feral Cat Clinic
Their parents or their parents parents were probably strays, yeah. Deep dark hills...they're not native species, lol, but most of the people left a (human) generation ago.

(they follow my kids, who caught them -as in baited cages-...except mae - I'm her spirit animal - the kids say, we do share a common interest in killing off tree rat, shes the only one who's friends with the dog. I think she thinks she's a dog, or that the dog is a cat, or that all three of us are the same whatever?)
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#27

Feral Cat Clinic
My family had a 5 acre smallholding with woodland a brook and stables and a barn. We had a family of feral cats living in the barn. Unfortunately the smallholding was located next to a busy A road and the mother cat was hideously injured crossing it, thankfully I had a shotgun at the time and I was able to put mummy cat out of her misery. Killing her wasn't difficult because I knew it was the right thing to do but it was difficult when it came to the kittens who I tried to raise and also find homes via a charity, this was not successful and therefore they suffered the same fate as mummy cat, it was horrible and I still think about it 38 years on. Sad
The whole point of having cake is to eat it Cake_Feast
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#28

Feral Cat Clinic
This cat's problem was fleas. I gave it some medicine and she is doing better now. She is very hungry again. I think I feed her too much at times because it's her only pleasure and her sides bulge out. She is appreciating rubs downs. I can catch her now and move her to a the bathroom so she can learn to use the litter box more consistently. Soon I will get her spayed, but I am worried they she will regress again.
______________

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#29

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-18-2023, 05:50 AM)Vorpal Wrote: This cat's problem was fleas.  I gave it some medicine and she is doing better now. She is very hungry again.  I think I feed her too much at times because it's her only pleasure and her sides bulge out.  She is appreciating rubs downs. I  can catch her now and move her to a the bathroom so she can learn to use the litter box more consistently. Soon I will get her spayed, but I am worried they she will regress again.

First, my cats got fleas last year, so I understand.  Seresto has a great 8 month flea collar that works great.  It isn't cheap, but 8 months is good per month.  I literally saw fleas dropping off the first day (one cat loves to sit on my newspaper and the fleas showed up well there).  

Second, may I suggest your cats need "toy-time"?  Toys provide exercise and stimulate their minds.  My cats love rattley mice and springs.  Plus, there are things to interest them with treats.  I have an "egg" with a hole that allows a few kibbles out when batted around.  And there is the "puzzle box".   That's a small box with holes.  You drop a few in the top and the cats have to paw around inside to retrieve them.  It feels like hunting to them.  You can buy one, but I made one myself.  It is just a small box with some paw-sized hole cut out.

The egg:

[Image: IMG-2091.jpg]

If your cat's sides are bulging, it is either fat (eating too much poor food) or has a medical problem.  Get it to a vet immediately!  BTW, dry food is not good for cats.  They are carnivores and dry food is way too much startch/plant.  The non-meat part is like feeding them sawdust.

Canned Fancy Feast is much better and is cheap at Walmart.  

And a spayed cat is a happier cat...
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#30

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-18-2023, 10:30 AM)Cavebear Wrote: And a spayed cat is a happier cat...

Very definitely. The sooner, the better. Their life changes for the better, you'll be surprised.
[Image: color%5D%5Bcolor=#333333%5D%5Bsize=small%5D%5Bfont=T...ans-Serif%5D]
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#31

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-18-2023, 10:30 AM)Cavebear Wrote: Second, may I suggest your cats need "toy-time"?  Toys provide exercise and stimulate their minds.  My cats love rattley mice and springs.  Plus, there are things to interest them with treats.  I have an "egg" with a hole that allows a few kibbles out when batted around.  And there is the "puzzle box".   That's a small box with holes.  You drop a few in the top and the cats have to paw around inside to retrieve them.  It feels like hunting to them.  You can buy one, but I made one myself.  It is just a small box with some paw-sized hole cut out.

The egg:

[Image: IMG-2091.jpg]

We tried food puzzles for our cat years ago. We quickly realized she was too smart for that shit. She always learned how to make them dump food quick & then just eat it all at once. She also learned how to pop open any food timers we set during overnight trips. I'm just glad she never figured out doorknobs. A friend's cat could actually open round doorknobs. He'd stand on his back legs, put his front paws on either side, & wiggle them up & down until the door popped open. On that note, my dad had a German shepherd that would bite doorknobs & turn his head to get in during thunderstorms.
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#32

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-22-2023, 01:25 PM)isbelldl Wrote:
(05-18-2023, 10:30 AM)Cavebear Wrote: Second, may I suggest your cats need "toy-time"?  Toys provide exercise and stimulate their minds.  My cats love rattley mice and springs.  Plus, there are things to interest them with treats.  I have an "egg" with a hole that allows a few kibbles out when batted around.  And there is the "puzzle box".   That's a small box with holes.  You drop a few in the top and the cats have to paw around inside to retrieve them.  It feels like hunting to them.  You can buy one, but I made one myself.  It is just a small box with some paw-sized hole cut out.

The egg:

[Image: IMG-2091.jpg]

We tried food puzzles for our cat years ago. We quickly realized she was too smart for that shit. She always learned how to make them dump food quick & then just eat it all at once. She also learned how to pop open any food timers we set during overnight trips. I'm just glad she never figured out doorknobs. A friend's cat could actually open round doorknobs. He'd stand on his back legs, put his front paws on either side, & wiggle them up & down until the door popped open. On that note, my dad had a German shepherd that would bite doorknobs & turn his head to get in during thunderstorms.

My cats stretch up to the deck opener lever often. They can't possibly manipulate the tiny lock sliders, but they do know where the opening part is. From their POV, I am like am a god who can manipulate several things they cant. But they do know where the parts that open the door is. It must be quite frustrating to them knowing the "where" but "can't". I understand their frustration, So I open the door anytime it seems good outside and I am going to be out there with them for gardening. I do watch them carefully outside.
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#33

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-09-2023, 02:16 PM)Dom Wrote:
(05-09-2023, 01:51 PM)Vorpal Wrote: Last week we had some good progess. The kitty jumped up next to me on the sofa and relaxed for ten minutes.  Then she has regressed and spent three days in the window sill behind the sofa.  She ate or drank very little. She's eating again now but is moving around the house in stealth mode.  

She was not pregnant.  Maybe she is really constipated.  And their might be fleas.

Or maybe she has a dead litter stuck in her womb. It happens. It calcifies. I do think you need to take her to the vet.

I think when she jumped on the couch with you, she was looking for help that wasn't happening. 

Get a big towel or blanket, throw it over her, grab her and pop her into a carrier. I have done it many times. Just shove her in, almost close the door and then pull out the blanket slowly. She needs to be checked, and if the vet is forewarned, he will tranquilize her for the examination. She will never know and just be relieved when she emerges in now familiar surroundings. She won't hate you for it. Promise. 

It sounds like she is sick, one way or another. Letting her suffer isn't good for anyone.

P.S. Keep the carrier covered during transport, so she only sees the interior of the carrier, not the scary world.

I finally have her in the bathroom.  The big towel idea never worked because she is too fast. She was out of range before the towel landed.  Instead I gradually got her used to my hands on her back, sides, and belly.  She was spooked at first but only for a few hours. The other day I pushed down on her back pretty hard. She left and came back immediately.  She actually liked that?  Today I just grabbed her underneath behind her front legs and above her hind legs with my bare hands.  She cried a bit and is looking for exits, but not too bad a move overall.
______________

I think I found me a batch of frumious bandersnatch. Dance  
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#34

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-27-2023, 05:54 PM)Vorpal Wrote:
(05-09-2023, 02:16 PM)Dom Wrote: Or maybe she has a dead litter stuck in her womb. It happens. It calcifies. I do think you need to take her to the vet.

I think when she jumped on the couch with you, she was looking for help that wasn't happening. 

Get a big towel or blanket, throw it over her, grab her and pop her into a carrier. I have done it many times. Just shove her in, almost close the door and then pull out the blanket slowly. She needs to be checked, and if the vet is forewarned, he will tranquilize her for the examination. She will never know and just be relieved when she emerges in now familiar surroundings. She won't hate you for it. Promise. 

It sounds like she is sick, one way or another. Letting her suffer isn't good for anyone.

P.S. Keep the carrier covered during transport, so she only sees the interior of the carrier, not the scary world.

I finally have her in the bathroom.  The big towel idea never worked because she is too fast. She was out of range before the towel landed.  Instead I gradually got her used to my hands on her back, sides, and belly.  She was spooked at first but only for a few hours. The other day I pushed down on her back pretty hard. She left and came back immediately.  She actually liked that?  Today I just grabbed her underneath behind her front legs and above her hind legs with my bare hands.  She cried a bit and is looking for exits, but not too bad a move overall.

If you can do that to her, she doesn't really need to be there except for potty training. Get her spayed! She will not know to blame you for the trip, and her personality will change 10000x for the better. Believe me!
[Image: color%5D%5Bcolor=#333333%5D%5Bsize=small%5D%5Bfont=T...ans-Serif%5D]
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#35

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-27-2023, 06:09 PM)Dom Wrote:
(05-27-2023, 05:54 PM)Vorpal Wrote: I finally have her in the bathroom.  The big towel idea never worked because she is too fast. She was out of range before the towel landed.  Instead I gradually got her used to my hands on her back, sides, and belly.  She was spooked at first but only for a few hours. The other day I pushed down on her back pretty hard. She left and came back immediately.  She actually liked that?  Today I just grabbed her underneath behind her front legs and above her hind legs with my bare hands.  She cried a bit and is looking for exits, but not too bad a move overall.

If you can do that to her, she doesn't really need to be there except for potty training. Get her spayed! She will not know to blame you for the trip, and her personality will change 10000x for the better. Believe me!

I needed to move her so I could flea bomb the room.  Yes and she needs to use the litter box better.  And she needs to learn to trust me to move her without panic. AND she needs to get used to the other cats who she can now see and smell better not that the share a door.
______________

I think I found me a batch of frumious bandersnatch. Dance  
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#36

Feral Cat Clinic
(05-27-2023, 06:26 PM)Vorpal Wrote:
(05-27-2023, 06:09 PM)Dom Wrote: If you can do that to her, she doesn't really need to be there except for potty training. Get her spayed! She will not know to blame you for the trip, and her personality will change 10000x for the better. Believe me!

I needed to move her so I could flea bomb the room.  Yes and she needs to use the litter box better.  And she needs to learn to trust me to move her without panic. AND she needs to get used to the other cats who she can now see and smell better not that the share a door.

ALL of this, ALL of it, will work a lot better once she is spayed. Hormones are her curse, regarding the litter, regarding the cats, regarding you. Just believe me! She will be a LOT happier, get along with everyone, be a lot calmer and adapt fully almost instantly. It's time!

Besides, she will return without fleas or flea eggs, for sure, vets take care of that. Gives you a chance to clean up the environment.
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#37

Feral Cat Clinic
So, I took her to the vet because she was bleeding. I think it was from her nether region.

Lo and behold it seems she was spayed before I ever captured her. Both her ears are misshapen. One apparently was clipped.

She probably has a parasite. The vet cost so far is $120.
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I think I found me a batch of frumious bandersnatch. Dance  
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#38

Feral Cat Clinic
(06-12-2023, 09:39 PM)Vorpal Wrote: So, I took her to the vet because she was bleeding.  I think it was from her nether region.  

Lo and behold it seems she was spayed before I ever captured her.  Both her ears are misshapen. One apparently was clipped.

She probably has a parasite.  The vet cost so far is $120.

I have purchased my dogs from reputable breeders and rescue shelters over the years.  Over have of them have come with parasites.  I’ve learned to just get a stool sample to the vet first thing and go from there.  Sorry kitty has problems but YAY, not having to spay!  I console myself on the cost of vet bills by realizing if it was a human being treated, it would be 10 times as much.
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#39

Feral Cat Clinic
There are 3 that we are working on catching and spaying/neutering. Dr David the roomie can do the boys in about a minute flat but the girls need a sterile field so we will take them in.
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#40

Feral Cat Clinic
It's slow going. My feral cat is still very skittish. She eats like every meal is her last. She allowed petting but won't tolerate being picked up. Not hissing at other cats but they hiss at her. I need Dom to suggest the next step.
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I think I found me a batch of frumious bandersnatch. Dance  
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#41

Feral Cat Clinic
(11-14-2023, 07:30 PM)Vorpal Wrote: It's slow going.  My feral cat is still very skittish. She eats like every meal is her last. She allowed petting but won't tolerate being picked up. Not hissing at other cats but they hiss at her.   I need Dom to suggest the next step.

I've been around cats 73 years (except the 4 years in college but I was still around them when I came home on some weekends and in Summer).  Some cats just don't feel safe when picked up.  Cats are used to "4 on the floor".  If you pick up a cat, be sure to support their feet with an arm or hands.

Feral cats are usually unsocialized to other cats as "friends".  Colonies of feral cats are rather cautious around each other.  Some may have a trusted other one from good experience, but they are mostly together for group protection and food supply.

Keep a mental list of things your feral likes and dislikes. Some accept petting, others don't understand the contact.  Some learn to enjoy toys, others don't.  Some may eat with others, some not.

And it takes time.  Cats feral from birth are harder to socialize than domesticated cats who have become lost and joined a colony.  I am a member of a cat-blogging group.  Some of the people there have adopted ferals successfully.  There might be some help there.

One way of getting cats used to each other is to comb off some furs from all and rub them on the others.  Scent is important.  Familiarity of scent means security.

A feral cat will eat quickly.  In a colony, there is always a threat that a larger cat will steal their food.  Giving your feral a private place to eat should help.  I have had domesticated cats how had trouble eating around others but were happy in another room.  One even needed the door closed before she would eat.  

Be aware of sounds.  Ferals aren't used to a lot of sudden noise.  If you are having friends over, put the feral in a separate room with food, litterbox, water, toys.  And some sounds trigger fears.  I once had a cat I got from a small pet store.  I realized one day that when I snapped open a trash bag, he would run and hide.  Maybe he had learned to associate trash bags with "dead kitties who never returned".  I'll never know.  But I stopped snapping trash bags open when he was in the house.  You never know what fears cats have, and ferals probably have more fears than others.

Every cat not raised by you from birth has a history you will never know.  And often some problems from kittenhood.  The smallest of a litter has trouble getting enough food.  Or is subdued by more adult cats.  Or treated meanly by other pets and humans.  

Try this...  When your feral is alone with you, hold a kibble in your hand, waving it aroubd to get its attention.  Then toss it across a hard floor (short at first and then longer).  The sound and motion will likely attract it's hunting instinct.  And when it associates you with food and hunting, it may come to trust you better.  My cats eat mostly canned food, so kibbles are sort of treats to them.  Make kibble-toss a game.  Cats love games.

NIP!  Most cats love catnip.  Some need a few tries with it.  Some never react.  But it is worth a try.  If Nip doesn't work, there is also Valerian.  I'm never tried that with my cats, but some bloggers say theirs love it.

Hope this helps...
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