Welcome to Atheist Discussion, a new community created by former members of The Thinking Atheist forum.

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Sci-fi saved me from God
#51

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 02:57 AM)skyking Wrote:
(08-05-2021, 01:56 AM)Tres Leches Wrote: I have a close family member who loves science fiction. LOVES it. They're a life-long voracious reader of sci-fi, since childhood. Yet they're very religious (Catholic), more so than most people I know.

I'm not convinced, generally speaking, that sci-fi is a path away from religion. If it is, imagine what science fact could do. Wink

-Teresa

One does not exclude the other, a solid background in the sciences makes it more entertaining when an author is true to what is known, and then "runs with it".

That's a good point.

I should say I'm not a fan of sci-fi apart from perhaps Harry Potter and I found my way to atheism through decidedly different routes.

I like dystopian fiction, though. I wonder what that means.  Consider

-Teresa
There is in the universe only one true divide, one real binary, life and death. Either you are living or you are not. Everything else is molten, malleable.

-Susan Faludi, In the Darkroom
Reply
#52

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 02:00 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 10:59 PM)Cubeology Wrote: Since when does archaeology or history, in general, reflect reality. People dig up miscellaneous bones and artifacts and then try to concoct theories on what life was once like. You're mistaken if you think this speculation on ancient cultures comports well with actual history.

Firstly, archaeology is based upon material facts, from which inferences may be drawn. Those inferences may or may not be correct, but they're a damned sight better than climbing up our own asses about what has happened in the past. Archaeology can identify when a culture gained this or that technology, made this or that leap of invention (cuneiform, anyone? Bueller? Bueller?), ascertain whether mythos might have a root in history, or even discover that ancients were more advanced than we thought (for instance, batteries in ancient Iraq, or the Antikythera discovery).

Of course we have to guess at what life was like before, and even during, historical phases. And of course we make errors in our hypotheses, guesses, and theories. But there's a lot we can figure out, even from trash-heaps and bone-piles, shipwrecks and ruined cities.

Physical anthropology is a solid science, tied in with radiometry, geostratigraphy, genetic studies, and other convergent sources of evidence.

Again: we will always get things wrong, but that's fine. Science works upon mistakes.

I'd b interested in hearing your version of "actual history" that you think we're misunderstanding. What do you think we're misunderstanding? Be specific, and where possible, link sources?

Several archaeological digs have disproven events in the Bible.   Archaeology found that the Walls of Jericho crumbled from neglect.  The wall is very old and has been rebuilt several times over the millennium but the area was abandoned several times because of  severe droughts.  However the Judean priests, writing the Jericho story in the 4th century,  had no idea they were setting the story in the 8th or 9th century during a severe drought and Jericho was pretty much a ghost town.  The walls slowly came down from neglect not trumpets.
                                                         T4618
The following 3 users Like Dancefortwo's post:
  • Thumpalumpacus, Inkubus, Alan V
Reply
#53

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 03:10 AM)Paleophyte Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 01:13 AM)Minimalist Wrote:
Quote:Reading any type of fiction will help inoculate you against religion.


 So you're suggesting that reading one type of fiction protects you again another type of fiction?

Interesting position.

Well, it will help protect you from believing that it's real. Magical thinking is tough to maintain when you know that magic is make believe.

I think there's a difference between suspending disbelief for the reading of a novel, and suspending disbelief for reading the Bible. Robert Heinlein never asked me to kneel and worship any of his heroes.

I knew going in that any novel I read was made-up, because they didn't herd me into a building once a week to lecture me about it.

Sci-fi apparently helped some folks question and abandon their religion, and that's all to the good, I say. But it's no surefire recipe, reading sci-fi, because compartmentalization is a thing.
Freedom isn't free.
The following 2 users Like Thumpalumpacus's post:
  • Tres Leches, Alan V
Reply
#54

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 02:00 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 10:59 PM)Cubeology Wrote: Since when does archaeology or history, in general, reflect reality. People dig up miscellaneous bones and artifacts and then try to concoct theories on what life was once like. You're mistaken if you think this speculation on ancient cultures comports well with actual history.

Firstly, archaeology is based upon material facts, from which inferences may be drawn. Those inferences may or may not be correct, but they're a damned sight better than climbing up our own asses about what has happened in the past. Archaeology can identify when a culture gained this or that technology, made this or that leap of invention (cuneiform, anyone? Bueller? Bueller?), ascertain whether mythos might have a root in history, or even discover that ancients were more advanced than we thought (for instance, batteries in ancient Iraq, or the Antikythera discovery).

Of course we have to guess at what life was like before, and even during, historical phases. And of course we make errors in our hypotheses, guesses, and theories. But there's a lot we can figure out, even from trash-heaps and bone-piles, shipwrecks and ruined cities.

Physical anthropology is a solid science, tied in with radiometry, geostratigraphy, genetic studies, and other convergent sources of evidence.

Again: we will always get things wrong, but that's fine. Science works upon mistakes.

I'd b interested in hearing your version of "actual history" that you think we're misunderstanding. What do you think we're misunderstanding? Be specific, and where possible, link sources?

I realize that archaeology is a science with hard data. But even scientific articles in journals are full of a lot of speculation; this is ok because at this point the separation of facts and speculation is generally made clear. Though by the time it reaches the general public in books and magazines the hard data is removed or oversimplified and pretty much only the speculation is left. 

If we compare like things hard science fiction (eg. I, Robot) compared to prehistoric fiction (Clan of the Cave Bear) both run into problems having to extrapolate and embellish to such a degree any reliability is necessarily questionable. Now, most fiction plays loosely with reality even contemporary fiction so I am making the assumption we are talking about the better books where the author honestly tries to be true to the possible. 

As far as history, it is hard to cite specific examples because we are generally left only with the version of history that survived. I'm sure I could find examples of American or Roman or whatever history where two completely different versions of the same events survived, but I'm too lazy to go look for them. 

Just think about the events in the US on January 6th. Despite the fact that there is a wealth of video evidence and personal accounts and it is a current event there is a large percentage of the population that believes various versions of what happened that are clearly not even remotely true. In the past, there was no video evidence to show the reality and what would be left would simply be the version that was successful at being accepted and written down. It might be the most heavily spun and corrupted version and just the view of those in political power. 

Another example is the political movement happening right now to whitewash much of American history when it comes to slavery and racism. They want to and have even been successful in some states at altering what is included in textbooks. This kind of intentional rewriting of history has been going on constantly and forever. 

The further you go back in time obvious the more distortions and inaccuracies there are. I studied ancient Greek history extensively at one time and know that large swaths of historical events were recorded almost entirely by one man, Herodotus. Who knows what bias and prejudices he hard that were incorporated into his accounts perhaps totally unintentionally.
The following 2 users Like Cubeology's post:
  • Alan V, Minimalist
Reply
#55

Sci-fi saved me from God
Most of science is speculation which ends up being discarded. That is a strength.

Of course history is softer, because it relies upon imperfect human retelling. Of course its retelling depends upon the point-of-view of the writer relating the story. There's more room for perspective, and plenty of room to disagree.

But there can be and often is hard evidence in support of historical retellings. It's not like history is working in a vacuum; like any other science, soft or hard, it has to work with information uncovered by other disciplines. When reading history, it's really useful to read the opposing sides of the same issue.
Freedom isn't free.
The following 2 users Like Thumpalumpacus's post:
  • vulcanlogician, Alan V
Reply
#56

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-04-2021, 01:53 PM)Vera Wrote: “Sometimes, people who read my work tell me, ‘I like it, but it’s not really science fiction, is it?’” he says. “And I always feel like, no, actually, my work is exactly science fiction.” After Star Wars forever made the genre synonymous with what Chiang calls “adventure stories dressed up with lasers,” people forgot that science fiction includes the word “science” for a reason: It is supposed to be largely about exploring the boundaries of knowledge, he says. “All the things I do in my work — engaging in thought experiments, investigating philosophical questions — those are all things that science fiction does.”

Angel

(And that pretentious twat's Villeneuve's abomination, Arrival, has precious little to do with Chiang, really.)

I agree with Chiang's general sentiment. I appreciate it when a sci-fi author takes time and consideration to make a fictional world rigorously scientific. Star Wars doesn't really do that.

But Star Wars is still cool in my book. It's just more "space fantasy" than sci-fi. I think there is a spectrum (or a continuum) between sci-fi and fantasy-fi. Star Trek falls more toward science than Star Wars, but still has some elements of fantasy (speculative FTL, psychic powers, and stuff). The Expanse is more geared to science than even Trek, and even more grounded in its approach to physics. Even Asimov incorporated some fantasy elements. It's tempting to do, and oftentimes benefits the work.
The following 2 users Like vulcanlogician's post:
  • Alan V, Thumpalumpacus
Reply
#57

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 06:17 AM)vulcanlogician Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 01:53 PM)Vera Wrote: “Sometimes, people who read my work tell me, ‘I like it, but it’s not really science fiction, is it?’” he says. “And I always feel like, no, actually, my work is exactly science fiction.” After Star Wars forever made the genre synonymous with what Chiang calls “adventure stories dressed up with lasers,” people forgot that science fiction includes the word “science” for a reason: It is supposed to be largely about exploring the boundaries of knowledge, he says. “All the things I do in my work — engaging in thought experiments, investigating philosophical questions — those are all things that science fiction does.”

Angel

(And that pretentious twat's Villeneuve's abomination, Arrival, has precious little to do with Chiang, really.)

I agree with Chiang's general sentiment. I appreciate it when a sci-fi author takes time and consideration to make a fictional world rigorously scientific. Star Wars doesn't really do that.

But Star Wars is still cool in my book. It's just more "space fantasy" than sci-fi. I think there is a spectrum (or a continuum) between sci-fi and fantasy-fi. Star Trek falls more toward science than Star Wars, but still has some elements of fantasy (speculative FTL, psychic powers, and stuff). The Expanse is more geared to science than even Trek, and even more grounded in its approach to physics. Even Asimov incorporated some fantasy elements. It's tempting to do, and oftentimes benefits the work.

While I like sci-fi authors to stay as close to what is currently scientific theory, no one would expect sci-fi writers to restrict themselves to only what we can rationalize right now. Unexpected revolutionary advances in technology happen. No one predicted the Internet and if you tried to explain it to a computer scientist in the 1950's they would have said it was pure fantasy, at least within the near future. In fact, no one had any idea of its potential while it was being developed, it grew organically with few people (now rich) knowing what was happening. 

The previously mentioned novel/show "The Expanse" had to invent the Epstein drive which has capabilities for which there is no current scientific basis. Also, while they avoided FTL they have traversable wormholes which are equally as great of a cheat. At least the flight characteristics of the spacecraft make sense. Except for near-future sci-fi, it is hard to write any interesting sci-fi that doesn't take some liberties. I agree that the show is one of the most well-written sci-fi shows.

The book series "The Uplift War" by David Brin is a good example of hard sci-fi but it uses FTL and probably other unlikely technologies that I don't recall but once you accept the revolutionary discovery(s) the rest of the narrative is internally consistent. The technological advance that is the big "what if" around which the series revolves is a reasonable extrapolation of current technologies, that is the idea of using genetic engineering to "uplift" animals to the level of sapience. 

On the other hand, the vast majority of sci-fi, particularly space opera, unfortunately just conjures up whatever they like without trying to explain it or make it follows any rules whatsoever. Generally, they are lazy and just steal ideas and use them because people are familiar with them, such as the shields on spaceships taken from Star Trek. While I read some of this stuff, I certainly value it much less more carefully reasoned sci-fi.
The following 1 user Likes Cubeology's post:
  • Alan V
Reply
#58

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-04-2021, 03:41 AM)Cubeology Wrote: ...As far as Star Trek, I am a big enough fan that I got married in a Star Trek uniform.

Seriously?  You were 14 when you got married, or did it as a guaranteed winning pub bet?      Big Grin

But please don't tell me you liked like this...

[Image: gen3.jpg]
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
Reply
#59

Sci-fi saved me from God
#54 is a good post except for this line.

Quote: I studied ancient Greek history extensively at one time and know that large swaths of historical events were recorded almost entirely by one man, Herodotus.


Herodotus is what has survived the ravages of time.  We simply cannot know what we do not have.
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
Reply
#60

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 12:51 PM)SYZ Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 03:41 AM)Cubeology Wrote: ...As far as Star Trek, I am a big enough fan that I got married in a Star Trek uniform.

Seriously?  You were 14 when you got married, or did it as a guaranteed winning pub bet?      Big Grin

But please don't tell me you liked like this...

[Image: gen3.jpg]

Personally I don't understand what anyone sees in Star Trek OR  Star Wars, but that's just me.  I'm not into science fiction at all but if someone put a gun to my head and forced me to choose I'd go with Star Trek, the original TV series.  There was a little bit of philosophy and humanity in the stories.  When Star Wars came out it was just another Horse Opera set in outerspace with lasers instead of guns and space ships instead of horses and then Star Trek movies jumped on the bandwaggon.   


Beware,  a rant follows......    

One thing that gets me furious about so many si-fi and superhero fantasy movies is the use of crescendo in story and  music.   In a 2 hour movie there is maybe 1/2 half hour of lead-up to the apex of the story and then 90 minutes of crescendo music, story and battle scenes.   I'm looking at you, Wonder Woman.  The goddamned battles went on for fucking ever!!!!  Jesusfuckingchrist! And the use of that stupid fucking drum blast that almost shakes the seats of the theatre is idiotic.  Stop it!  Just stop it!  Hollywood is run by special effects people who love to show off their newest shit.  There's maybe 20 pages of dialogue and the rest is special effects.... and guess what,  I don't give two fucks about special-fucking-effects.   Give me a well constructed story.  

Back in the 30's and 40's Hollywood used to employ some top notch writers to write screenplays.  It's a pretty amazing list of authors. But these days any Jo Schmo who has a story idea is a potential screen writer.  It doesn't matter how stupid the story is when he or she pitches it to a producer because if there's any chance a lot of special effects can be added to the story it's given the green light. 

OK, rant over......


Whistling
                                                         T4618
The following 6 users Like Dancefortwo's post:
  • Inkubus, vulcanlogician, Thumpalumpacus, GenesisNemesis, Dānu, brunumb
Reply
#61

Sci-fi saved me from God
Excellent rant.
The following 1 user Likes Inkubus's post:
  • Dancefortwo
Reply
#62

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 12:51 PM)SYZ Wrote:
(08-04-2021, 03:41 AM)Cubeology Wrote: ...As far as Star Trek, I am a big enough fan that I got married in a Star Trek uniform.

Seriously?  You were 14 when you got married, or did it as a guaranteed winning pub bet?      Big Grin

But please don't tell me you liked like this...

[Image: gen3.jpg]

No, I wasn't 14, but I suffer from bipolar disorder and at the time it was undiagnosed and untreated. I've done many things on impulse that were bizarre, the question I really wonder about is why the people around me went along with it. And yes, it was that uniform that I wore.
The following 2 users Like Cubeology's post:
  • Dom, SYZ
Reply
#63

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 03:46 PM)Dancefortwo Wrote: Beware,  a rant follows......    

One thing that gets me furious about so many si-fi and superhero fantasy movies is the use of crescendo in story and  music.   In a 2 hour movie there is maybe 1/2 half hour of lead-up to the apex of the story and then 90 minutes of crescendo music, story and battle scenes.   I'm looking at you, Wonder Woman.  The goddamned battles went on for fucking ever!!!!  Jesusfuckingchrist! And the use of that stupid fucking drum blast that almost shakes the seats of the theatre is idiotic.  Stop it!  Just stop it!  Hollywood is run by special effects people who love to show off their newest shit.  There's maybe 20 pages of dialogue and the rest is special effects.... and guess what,  I don't give two fucks about special-fucking-effects.   Give me a well constructed story.  

Back in the 30's and 40's Hollywood used to employ some top notch writers to write screenplays.  It's a pretty amazing list of authors. But these days any Jo Schmo who has a story idea is a potential screen writer.  It doesn't matter how stupid the story is when he or she pitches it to a producer because if there's any chance a lot of special effects can be added to the story it's given the green light. 

OK, rant over......


Whistling

I agree with your rant wholeheartedly. 

Originality is discouraged because producers don't want to take a chance on something that hasn't already been shown to be profitable.

While there are few action movies that I find compelling, I did like "Cruella." It is a fast-moving character-driven adventure that wasn't centered around people shooting and stabbing each other.
Reply
#64

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 03:46 PM)Dancefortwo Wrote: There's maybe 20 pages of dialogue and the rest is special effects.... and guess what,  I don't give two fucks about special-fucking-effects.   Give me a well constructed story.  

I'm super bummed that Colony got cancelled. I loved that show. It was all plot. You don't even SEE the aliens the first couple of seasons. But you get to know them better than, say, in the Tomorrow War with its really cool-looking CGI. In, Colony, you come to understand the aliens motives just by seeing how they influence human society. They are three dimensional, yet still mysterious.

Colony was such a good show.
The following 1 user Likes vulcanlogician's post:
  • Dancefortwo
Reply
#65

Sci-fi saved me from God
I'm actually doing some sci-fi world building. Maybe I'll make a thread about it.

It's going to be more-or-less hard science fiction. It is set over a million years in the future. In our own solar system. There is no interstellar travel in one life time, no FTL or anything like that. But here's the gimmick: it's a space opera. There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish.

I plan to write a short story in this setting. The protagonist (a human who has been in stasis) goes on a romp through the solar system, battles some Kypers and Jovians in a star ship. Discovers that all the species in the solar system are humans evolved. And rallies everyone to fend off an onslaught of von Neumann probes-- all the tropes. I've asked professional scientists for help in getting the physics right. I may even construct an RPG based on the setting.
The following 1 user Likes vulcanlogician's post:
  • Alan V
Reply
#66

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 07:42 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: I'm actually doing some sci-fi world building. Maybe I'll make a thread about it.

It's going to be more-or-less hard science fiction. It is set over a million years in the future. In our own solar system. There is no interstellar travel in one life time, no FTL or anything like that. But here's the gimmick: it's a space opera. There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish.

I plan to write a short story in this setting. The protagonist (a human who has been in stasis) goes on a romp through the solar system, battles some Kypers and Jovians in a star ship. Discovers that all the species in the solar system are humans evolved. And rallies everyone to fend off an onslaught of von Neumann probes-- all the tropes. I've asked professional scientists for help in getting the physics right. I may even construct an RPG based on the setting.

It sounds interesting, though part of the plot sounds like H.G. Wells' The Time Machine.  Was that your inspiration?
Reply
#67

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 07:48 PM)Alan V Wrote:
(08-05-2021, 07:42 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: I'm actually doing some sci-fi world building. Maybe I'll make a thread about it.

It's going to be more-or-less hard science fiction. It is set over a million years in the future. In our own solar system. There is no interstellar travel in one life time, no FTL or anything like that. But here's the gimmick: it's a space opera. There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish.

I plan to write a short story in this setting. The protagonist (a human who has been in stasis) goes on a romp through the solar system, battles some Kypers and Jovians in a star ship. Discovers that all the species in the solar system are humans evolved. And rallies everyone to fend off an onslaught of von Neumann probes-- all the tropes. I've asked professional scientists for help in getting the physics right. I may even construct an RPG based on the setting.

It sounds interesting, though part of the plot sounds like H.G. Wells' The Time Machine.  Was that your inspiration?

I'd say I got more inspiration from Isaac Arthur (YouTube futurist). There are a ton of megastructures in my setting. Most of the aliens in the solar system (except for the Jovians) sort of "inherited" the megastructures from the long dead human civilization. Think "wild west" cultural maturity but they have access to the technology of great civilizations.

The Jovians are culturally advanced and continue to build megastructures.
The following 1 user Likes vulcanlogician's post:
  • Alan V
Reply
#68

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 03:46 PM)Dancefortwo Wrote: Personally I don't understand what anyone sees in Star Trek OR  Star Wars
 

I've watched several episodes of Star Trek: TNG so far and thought some of the themes were interesting. Still can't get over how ridiculous the aliens look though (looking at you, Klingons).
Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.  Deadpan Coffee Drinker
Reply
#69

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 03:46 PM)Dancefortwo Wrote: One thing that gets me furious about so many si-fi and superhero fantasy movies is the use of crescendo in story and  music.   In a 2 hour movie there is maybe 1/2 half hour of lead-up to the apex of the story and then 90 minutes of crescendo music, story and battle scenes.   I'm looking at you, Wonder Woman.  The goddamned battles went on for fucking ever!!!!  Jesusfuckingchrist! And the use of that stupid fucking drum blast that almost shakes the seats of the theatre is idiotic.  Stop it!  Just stop it!  Hollywood is run by special effects people who love to show off their newest shit.  There's maybe 20 pages of dialogue and the rest is special effects.... and guess what,  I don't give two fucks about special-fucking-effects.   Give me a well constructed story.  

That's actually what I look for in a movie. I'm not a watcher, so I need something to keep my attention focused.
[Image: sea-stones-whimsy-7-sm.jpg]
Reply
#70

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-05-2021, 07:42 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish

Considering what we know about the nature of Jupiter, may I ask how you solved the problem of having any sort of aliens living there.  Thanks.
No gods necessary
Reply
#71

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-06-2021, 12:18 AM)brunumb Wrote:
(08-05-2021, 07:42 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish

Considering what we know about the nature of Jupiter, may I ask how you solved the problem of having any sort of aliens living there.  Thanks.

They live on orbital rings on Jupiter's moons.
Reply
#72

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-06-2021, 12:19 AM)vulcanlogician Wrote:
(08-06-2021, 12:18 AM)brunumb Wrote:
(08-05-2021, 07:42 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: There are different alien species living on each planet... Martians on Mars, Jovians on Jupiter, in the outer solar system are Kypers a vicious humanoid species modelled after the Anglerfish

Considering what we know about the nature of Jupiter, may I ask how you solved the problem of having any sort of aliens living there.  Thanks.

They live on orbital rings on Jupiter's moons.

[Image: Orbitale.jpg]

What a beautiful idea.
The following 1 user Likes Inkubus's post:
  • GenesisNemesis
Reply
#73

Sci-fi saved me from God
It is odd that the focus of the thread has been largely on movie and television stories, rather than books by Asimov, Brin, Heinlein, and others. Those movie and TV show scripts were written to make money first and foremost IMO.
They define the genre of Sci-FI the same way that Fruit Loops defines breakfast. Big Grin
test signature
The following 1 user Likes skyking's post:
  • SYZ
Reply
#74

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-06-2021, 02:39 AM)skyking Wrote: It is odd that the focus of the thread has been largely on movie and television stories, rather than books by Asimov, Brin, Heinlein, and others. Those movie and TV show scripts were written to make money first and foremost IMO.
They define the genre of Sci-FI the same way that Fruit Loops defines breakfast. Big Grin

Yeah, those authors are among those that I read as a child and had the influence I referred to in my OP. Good sci-fi novels are all about ideas about society and people and how they are affected by changing times and technology. These ideas are what I think broadened my mind and made me look at religion with a more critical eye. 

When sci-fi is put on the screen there is no way to incorporate the deeper ideas into that format. Instead, it is all about impacting the watcher with a visual experience, and when good might impact you emotionally and leave you with a little something to think about. There is some value in that kind of media but it isn't the same as a good book. 

As much as I love the classic sci-fi writers, there are many great ones who are not dead and who are writing excellent books. For anyone looking for something to read, check out some of my favorites China Melville, Cixin Liu, Ann Leckie, and Neal Stephenson. There are more but these are those that came to mind, anyone having names to add, I'd be glad to hear them.
The following 1 user Likes Cubeology's post:
  • skyking
Reply
#75

Sci-fi saved me from God
(08-06-2021, 04:57 AM)Cubeology Wrote:
(08-06-2021, 02:39 AM)skyking Wrote: It is odd that the focus of the thread has been largely on movie and television stories, rather than books by Asimov, Brin, Heinlein, and others. Those movie and TV show scripts were written to make money first and foremost IMO.
They define the genre of Sci-FI the same way that Fruit Loops defines breakfast. Big Grin

Yeah, those authors are among those that I read as a child and had the influence I referred to in my OP. Good sci-fi novels are all about ideas about society and people and how they are affected by changing times and technology. These ideas are what I think broadened my mind and made me look at religion with a more critical eye. 

When sci-fi is put on the screen there is no way to incorporate the deeper ideas into that format. Instead, it is all about impacting the watcher with a visual experience, and when good might impact you emotionally and leave you with a little something to think about. There is some value in that kind of media but it isn't the same as a good book. 

As much as I love the classic sci-fi writers, there are many great ones who are not dead and who are writing excellent books. For anyone looking for something to read, check out some of my favorites China Melville, Cixin Liu, Ann Leckie, and Neal Stephenson. There are more but these are those that came to mind, anyone having names to add, I'd be glad to hear them.

I only mentioned those few notables for expediency. I too have read many more authors and also contemporary ones, but not so much any more.
test signature
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)