Welcome to Atheist Discussion, a new community created by former members of The Thinking Atheist forum.

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The IT Thread
#76

The IT Thread
If there are any other developers or former developers around here, I'll just leave this semi-rant for what it's worth.

I have no real regrets that I've focused for the past 25 years or so on the Microsoft dev stack. The tooling is generally excellent. Except ...

Except that Microsoft has a really bad habit of pushing something to be adopted that's the Next Great Thing and Final Answer, and then suddenly deciding that it's not.

One I remember from awhile ago was .NET Remoting. If you needed to do IPC, it was Da Bomb and SO superior to its unmanaged predecessors. Until it wasn't. Then it became, IIRC, Windows Communications Framework. Remoting would be supported as to bug fixes for an indefinite time, but this utterly different API meant that I'd have to convince clients to completely rewrite solutions I'd provided based on Remoting, if they wanted to not have difficulty maintaining code that now, some 15 years later, no one remembers or understands anymore.

One of my responses to this kind of thing was to style myself as mainly a back-end guy. There's enough churn there, without dealing with all the crazy conflicting approaches on the client-facing side of things. But now the trend is "full stack development". Employers, as usual, want it all, so they insist you know the front end. Angular, React, Vue, jQuery, etc etc etc as well as platform-specific architectures.

So I just spent six joyless months figuring out something that used to be pre-MVC ASP.NET but is now slathered with proprietary JavaScript and XML, which translates to basically nowhere. And now I'm being moved to a team maintaining ASP.NET MVC v5 with a side helping of jQuery, that they want to move to .NET 6 in coming months, so yay -- except now that I look at it, Microsoft has decided that the way forward is something only vaguely compatible that requires significant refactoring to move your code base forward, called "ASP.NET core with MVC".

I miss the days when you could just focus on solving problems for people instead of keeping up with someone else's committee and marketing-drivers vision of how your architecture should work. I would say that since unwillingly re-entering the corporate development world, some 60% of my time is spent either on migrations like this or figuring out something that's stuck in the past. Neither is any fun at all, apart from how occasionally some small aspect of it resolves a chronic pain point.

It's one thing to take someone else's poorly written code and make it great. It's another to break everything in the service of your vendor deciding to rename stuff and move it to different namespaces and changing former best practices.

Is it any better on the open source side? I'm doubtful. Too much in software development is fad-driven. It's as much about the promise of bright shiny new playthings to placate management about why things aren't Moving Along at the desired pace, as it is about engineering.

Thus enders the rant.

Curious what other's experience or coping strategies may be here.

Mine would be to have sole responsibility for an app or system and just do what I felt was best and be held responsible for results. That has always served me well. I don't see a way to do that anymore. It is all about chanting "no blockers" in scrum standup meetings and working tickets.
Reply
#77

The IT Thread
Remember these (then) hot shit devices that you could actually move the cursor/pointer
through a full 360º on-screen.  Wow!      And fire your gun or bat your ball with an actual
dedicated button.  Wow again!     (Atari XE, 1977 I think?)

[Image: 575px-Atari_XE_joystick_%28colour_restored%29.jpg]


This was the first mouse (actually a "puck") that I used professionally, probably circa 1988.
[Image: ENW9asEXkAEf_h9?format=jpg&name=small]

[Image: EfE9oZcXYAASA2E?format=jpg&name=small]

The "mat" is an AutoCAD digitising tablet, connected to the computer.
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
The following 1 user Likes SYZ's post:
  • mordant
Reply
#78

The IT Thread
(10-10-2021, 09:00 PM)SYZ Wrote: circa 1988.

circa 2021 the mat is built into the mouse. 

[Image: SpaceMouse-Enterprise-main_header_image.jpg]
Save a life. Adopt a Greyhound.
[Image: JUkLw58.gif]
Reply
#79

The IT Thread
(10-09-2021, 04:04 AM)Minimalist Wrote: Maybe god is an atheist?

Mine is.  Smile
Reply
#80

The IT Thread
(10-09-2021, 10:29 PM)mordant Wrote: It seemed to be a law that at least one person you were sharing the line with was some old biddy with nothing else to do but listen in on your calls.

Smile  I remember that!
Reply
#81

The IT Thread
(10-10-2021, 09:00 PM)SYZ Wrote: Remember these (then) hot shit devices that you could actually move the cursor/pointer
through a full 360º on-screen.  Wow!      And fire your gun or bat your ball with an actual
dedicated button.  Wow again!     (Atari XE, 1977 I think?)

[Image: 575px-Atari_XE_joystick_%28colour_restored%29.jpg]


This was the first mouse (actually a "puck") that I used professionally, probably circa 1988.
[Image: ENW9asEXkAEf_h9?format=jpg&name=small]

[Image: EfE9oZcXYAASA2E?format=jpg&name=small]

The "mat" is an AutoCAD digitising tablet, connected to the computer.
It's amazing what could be accomplished with the relatively limited hardware of that era.

My first hard drive had a capacity of 5 megabytes and cost $2,000. It was connected to my 8 bit TRS-80 model 4 (128K of bank-switched RAM, Z-80 processor at 4 mhz) by a 50-pin cable and resembled (and was the size of) a cash resister drawer. And it was about one-tenth the speed of modern mechanical hard drives.

But at the time, it was magic.
The following 1 user Likes mordant's post:
  • SYZ
Reply
#82

The IT Thread
They have come a long way, but coffee still killed my chromebook today. you'd think Coffee-proof-ness would have been figured out long ago.
test signature
The following 1 user Likes skyking's post:
  • mordant
Reply
#83

The IT Thread
(10-12-2021, 04:28 AM)skyking Wrote: They have come a long way, but coffee still killed my chromebook today. you'd think Coffee-proof-ness would have been figured out long ago.
"They can send men to the moon, but they can't coffee-proof a laptop."
Reply
#84

The IT Thread
(10-12-2021, 04:28 AM)skyking Wrote: They have come a long way, but coffee still killed my chromebook today. you'd think Coffee-proof-ness would have been figured out long ago.

Stop drinking coffee?

I had a rollerball once.  Never got used to it and some programs wouldn't recognize it.
I am tying notes to balloons and tumble-weeds and sending them out to the world. Where they are found, I do not know...
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)