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A small step for fusion power...
#1

A small step for fusion power...
... a potential giant leap for humanity. Or we can at least hope.

"Nuclear fusion’s energy potential is vast. Scientists believe it could, theoretically, lead to the construction of commercial power plants that would deliver virtually unlimited amounts of energy without leaving a trail of waste behind.

But efforts to harness the technology have been exceedingly slow.

However, a small step forward has been made by scientists at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility operated by San Diego-based General Atomics.

Researchers conducted a first of its kind experiment focusing on a long-observed but little understood mechanism that can enhance the performance of fusion projects, including a multi-national and multi-billion dollar effort under construction in France."

"Got my fingers crossed.’ As ITER fusion project marks milestone, chief ponders pandemic impact"

Show ContentSpoiler:

Both articles are rather interesting.
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#2

A small step for fusion power...
The oil companies and their republicunt buddies will tie them up in litigation for the next 50 years and China will slip by and develop it first.

We are hopelessly wedded to the past.
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#3

A small step for fusion power...
[Image: Roosevelt-Harping-on-one-string-e1447963369642.jpg]
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#4

A small step for fusion power...
(05-28-2020, 08:24 PM)Minimalist Wrote: The oil companies and their republicunt buddies will tie them up in litigation for the next 50 years and China will slip by and develop it first.

We are hopelessly wedded to the past.

China is already part of the project.
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#5

A small step for fusion power...
(05-28-2020, 08:49 PM)Mr Greene Wrote: China is already part of the project.
[Image: min_meet_iterflags.jpg]

And Russia! This is no fusion power project, this is some nefarious Putin power project, meant to make him live forever and/or clone Orange Fuckface. Run for the hills (and the nuclear fallout shelters) Panic


Deadpan Coffee Drinker
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#6

A small step for fusion power...
[Image: 1*mHaijYuh4Gfqz2hV-nwv0A.jpeg]
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#7

A small step for fusion power...
Kindly take your shit somewhere else. This is unacceptable and deeply offensive to the people who actually want to have a conversation, not a mindless rant. You did the same in my last two scientific threads even after I explicitly said this is rude, narcissistic and disrespectful to the forum.
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#8

A small step for fusion power...
These reactors need an energy input to keep working, in theory, they should output much more than they need to operate. This makes them more safe than fission reactors, as those require control rods and any malfunction can cause an incontrolable chain reaction. In fusion reactors, malfunctions may cause an accident, but any damage would be local and the reactor would stop immediately with just a couple of circuit breakers.
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#9

A small step for fusion power...
(05-29-2020, 12:22 PM)LastPoet Wrote: These reactors need an energy input to keep working, in theory, they should output much more than they need to operate. This makes them more safe than fission reactors, as those require control rods and any malfunction can cause an incontrolable chain reaction. In fusion reactors, malfunctions may cause an accident, but any damage would be local and the reactor would stop immediately with just a couple of circuit breakers.

It has such potential and yet, the moment one makes the mistake of trying to read some comments, it is all a bunch of armchair physicists arguing ad nauseam, Nah, we should have invested in solar power instead (because it's either/or and because we invest sooooooo much in fusion...), It's never gonna happen, etc.

Our capacity to disagree and fight on all topics, for the sheer infantile pleasure of disagreeing and fighting is astounding. On a forum like this it's just pathetic to see, when it's literally a matter of survival it becomes terrifying.
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#10

A small step for fusion power...
Scientists Start Assembling The World's Largest Nuclear Fusion Experiment

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And of course:

"Such "artificial suns," however, are criticised by environmentalists as a cripplingly expensive scientific mirage."

Indeed, let's not even try because "environmentalists" are to the last person highly-educated scientists that are beyond criticism or even the ability to be wrong. I mean, who doesn't trust GreenPeace implicitly, right? Deadpan Coffee Drinker

An interesting article (funny that they quote Monbiot because he is so often full of so much self-righteous shit, it's painful, even embarrassing to read)

"[...]

Most major environmental groups — from Friends of the Earth to Greenpeace to the Sierra Club — want a ban or moratorium on GM crops, especially for food. They fear the toxicity of these “Frankenfoods,” are concerned the introduced genes will pollute wild strains of the crops, and worry that GM seeds are a weapon in the takeover of the world’s food supply by agribusiness.

For myself, I am deeply concerned about the power of business over the world’s seeds and food supply. But GM crops are an insignificant part of that control, which is based on money and control of trading networks. Clearly there are issues about gene pollution, though research suggesting there is a problem is still very thin. Let’s do the research, rather than trash the test fields, which has been the default response of groups such as Greenpeace, particularly in my home country of Britain.

As for the Frankenfoods argument, the evidence is just not there. As the British former campaigner against GMs, Mark Lynas published in September in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, that GM corn can produced tumors in rats, has been attacked as flawed in execution and conclusion by a wide range of experts with no axe to grind. In any event, the controversial study was primarily about the potential impact of Roundup, a herbicide widely used with GM corn, and not the GM technology itself.

[...]

"And more recently, remember the confusion over biofuels? They were a new green energy source we could all support. I remember, when the biofuels craze began about 2005, I reported on a few voices urging caution. They warned that the huge land take of crops like corn and sugar cane for biofuels might threaten food supplies; that the crops would add to the destruction of rainforests; and that the carbon gains were often small to non-existent. But Friends of the Earth and others trashed them as traitors to the cause of green energy.

Well, today most greens are against most biofuels. Not least Friends of the Earth, which calls them a “big green con.” In fact, we may have swung too far in the other direction, undermining research into second-generation biofuels that could be both land- and carbon-efficient.

We don’t have to be slaves to science. There is plenty of room for raising questions about ethics and priorities that challenge the world view of the average lab grunt. And we should blow the whistle on bad science. But to indulge in hysterical attacks on any new technology that does not excite our prejudices, or to accuse genuine researchers of being part of a global conspiracy, is dishonest and self-defeating.

We environmentalists should learn to be more humble about our policy prescriptions, more willing to hear competing arguments, and less keen to engage in hectoring and bullying."
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#11

A small step for fusion power...
I find it really frustrating that so many people insist on a perfect solution to every problem, and rejecting improvements because they don't solve every.single.issue.
Freedom isn't free.
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#12

A small step for fusion power...
Yes, The perfect is the enemy of the good.
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#13

A small step for fusion power...
The irony is that we can turn the surface of the planet to cinders using thermonuclear bombs while harnessing that power to bring a relatively clean, unlimited source of energy to all mankind keeps it in a drawer.

Money, its always about that.
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#14

A small step for fusion power...
(07-30-2020, 02:42 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote: I find it really frustrating that so many people insist on a perfect solution to every problem, and rejecting improvements because they don't solve every.single.issue.

While I agree with the sentiment of not letting the "perfect" be the enemy of "good enough," I have a hard time getting excited about a technology that was a decade away 20 years ago and is still a decade away today.
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#15

A small step for fusion power...
But the day it's here, is the day it's here.
Kaboom. Tongue
If they prove it can work on a large scale, there will be a race to get it functional.
Earlier this year, (as the pandemic began) oil commodity prices actually went negative, (first time ever I think), as they couldn't sell it, and had to pay to store it.)
Also, slowly but surely, oil prices have steadily fallen as alternatives have been identified and proliferated.
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#16

A small step for fusion power...
(07-30-2020, 07:12 PM)TheGentlemanBastard Wrote:
(07-30-2020, 02:42 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote: I find it really frustrating that so many people insist on a perfect solution to every problem, and rejecting improvements because they don't solve every.single.issue.

While I agree with the sentiment of not letting the "perfect" be the enemy of "good enough," I have a hard time getting excited about a technology that was a decade away 20 years ago and is still a decade away today.

Sure -- they've been going on promises since I was a lad. But sometimes tough problems take a loooooong time to solve.
Freedom isn't free.
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