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Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
#1
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Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
This year is a leap year, which supposedly occurs every 4 years—and today, 29 February is a leap day.

But that's not necessarily true, although a common belief.

Under the Gregorian calendar, a leap year must be able to be divided by 4 and by 100.  But it also must
be able to be divided by 400 with no remainder.  So, for example, the year 2000 was a leap year, as it can
be divided into 500, 20 and 5. But 1900 was not. Although it can be divided by 4 and 100 (475 and 19) it
can't be evenly divided by 400.

And neither will 2100 be a leap year.  Or 2200 or 2300.

Why?  Instead of having 100 leap years every 400 years the Gregorian calendar has 97, which refines the
number of days in a year down to 365.2425 (when compared to the earlier Julian calendar of 365.25 days).

—Confused?      Big Grin
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#2

Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
(02-28-2020, 07:36 PM)SYZ Wrote: —Confused?      Big Grin

Yes, but that's because your explanation is a little off. To be a leap year the year must be divisible by 4 unless it is divisible  by 100. If a year is divisible by 100 it must also be divisible  by 400 to be a leap year.
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#3

Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
(02-28-2020, 07:36 PM)SYZ Wrote: This year is a leap year, which supposedly occurs every 4 years—and today, 29 February is a leap day.

But that's not necessarily true, although a common belief.

Under the Gregorian calendar, a leap year must be able to be divided by 4 and by 100.  But it also must
be able to be divided by 400 with no remainder.  So, for example, the year 2000 was a leap year, as it can
be divided into 500, 20 and 5. But 1900 was not. Although it can be divided by 4 and 100 (475 and 19) it
can't be evenly divided by 400.

And neither will 2100 be a leap year.  Or 2200 or 2300.

Why?  Instead of having 100 leap years every 400 years the Gregorian calendar has 97, which refines the
number of days in a year down to 365.2425 (when compared to the earlier Julian calendar of 365.25 days).

—Confused?      Big Grin

No. Modern clocks are much more accurate. "A leap second is a one-second adjustment that is occasionally applied to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), to accommodate the difference between precise time (as measured by atomic clocks) and imprecise observed solar time (known as UT1 and which varies due to irregularities and long-term slowdown in the Earth's rotation). The UTC time standard, which is widely used for international timekeeping and as the reference for civil time in most countries, uses precise "atomic time" and consequently would run ahead of observed solar time unless it is reset to UT1 as needed. The leap second facility exists to provide this adjustment.

Because the Earth's rotation speed varies in response to climatic and geological events, UTC leap seconds are irregularly spaced and unpredictable. Insertion of each UTC leap second is usually decided about six months in advance by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), to ensure that the difference between the UTC and UT1 readings will never exceed 0.9 seconds.

This practice has proved disruptive, particularly in the twenty-first century and especially in services that depend on precise time stamping or time-critical process control. The relevant international standards body has been debating whether or not to continue the practice, with an increasing number of nations supporting its abolition". Wikipedia

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#4

Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
I'm good, I saw the Schoolhouse Rock special on this.
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#5

Leap Years... Not Every 4 Years?
(02-28-2020, 07:36 PM)SYZ Wrote: This year is a leap year, which supposedly occurs every 4 years—and today, 29 February is a leap day.

But that's not necessarily true, although a common belief.

Under the Gregorian calendar, a leap year must be able to be divided by 4 and by 100.  But it also must
be able to be divided by 400 with no remainder.  So, for example, the year 2000 was a leap year, as it can
be divided into 500, 20 and 5. But 1900 was not. Although it can be divided by 4 and 100 (475 and 19) it
can't be evenly divided by 400.

And neither will 2100 be a leap year.  Or 2200 or 2300.

Why?  Instead of having 100 leap years every 400 years the Gregorian calendar has 97, which refines the
number of days in a year down to 365.2425 (when compared to the earlier Julian calendar of 365.25 days).

—Confused?      Big Grin

Damn it, this is why dates were off!!!!!! When I tried to account for leap years!!!!
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