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The Peopling of the Americas
#1

The Peopling of the Americas
A long article from Smithsonian.  Pretty much demolishes Clovis-First once and for all.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n...180973739/

Quote:The Fertile Shore

It’s one of the greatest mysteries of our time. But archaeologists and even geneticists are closer than ever to understanding when humans made the first bold journey to the Americas




Unless the Valsequillo proponents are right, that is!

https://www.uv.es/~pardomv/pe/2011_3/27_..._malde.pdf
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#2

The Peopling of the Americas
It has always been obvious that the first people in North America didn't teleport into New Mexico.
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#3

The Peopling of the Americas
Temperatures are milder on the seashore, and both plants and proteins seem easier to collect. Even if, as is likely, the walkers led the way, constructing craft able to deal with the Alaska Current doesn't seem like a very difficult thing, and I'd expect those settlers to do that.
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#4

The Peopling of the Americas
Groups of kayaks, going along the edge of the ice, could have taken whole tribes down to ice free country jig time.
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#5

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 12:53 AM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: Groups of kayaks, going along the edge of the ice, could have taken whole tribes down to ice free country jig time.

If nothing else they could scout ahead for river-mouths and other inlets that would provide food and shelter for the main body of the tribe.
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#6

The Peopling of the Americas
Quote:Even if, as is likely, the walkers led the way


Big discussion over at Archaeologica on that very point, a few years ago.  What is it like for a small group ( 20-30 people, including children) to move along across country.  One hand on your weapon at all times reduces the carrying capacity of the group.  You have to constantly watch for predators.  Every stream crossing is a hazard.  Every river crossing becomes a monumental job and you'd have to stop and build rafts anyway.  Every night you need to find some type of shelter to give you some protection from animals if not from weather. 

Once you have learned how to build a boat it seems much easier to paddle out beyond the breakers,  travel within sight of the coast and when night comes head in to shore.  If the weather looks shitty the next morning you stay put.  Gather what you need from the sea or the local environs.  When the weather clears, move on.  You can carry lots of extra stuff in the bottom of the boat and keep your hands free.  One man can serve as lookout for the whole flotilla.

I always smile when someone explains how early man came Out of Africa and spread into Asia.  I always wonder "how did they cross the Shatt-al-Arab?"  May as well have a boat!
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#7

The Peopling of the Americas
The Australian aborigines walked from Indonesia to the Australian land mass, and then to the island of Tasmania
when these three land masses were connected. And they too originated in Africa.

There were lots of these land bridges 1000,000 years ago.
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#8

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 02:41 AM)Minimalist Wrote:
Quote:Even if, as is likely, the walkers led the way


Big discussion over at Archaeologica on that very point, a few years ago.  What is it like for a small group ( 20-30 people, including children) to move along across country.  One hand on your weapon at all times reduces the carrying capacity of the group.  You have to constantly watch for predators.  Every stream crossing is a hazard.  Every river crossing becomes a monumental job and you'd have to stop and build rafts anyway.  Every night you need to find some type of shelter to give you some protection from animals if not from weather. 

Once you have learned how to build a boat it seems much easier to paddle out beyond the breakers,  travel within sight of the coast and when night comes head in to shore.  If the weather looks shitty the next morning you stay put.  Gather what you need from the sea or the local environs.  When the weather clears, move on.  You can carry lots of extra stuff in the bottom of the boat and keep your hands free.  One man can serve as lookout for the whole flotilla.

I always smile when someone explains how early man came Out of Africa and spread into Asia.  I always wonder "how did they cross the Shatt-al-Arab?"  May as well have a boat!

They probably got a ride with the guys who were living there. The Daniel Boone Rule would apply. "If I can see the smoke from my nearest neighbor's house, I move farther west."
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#9

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 02:41 AM)Minimalist Wrote: I always smile when someone explains how early man came Out of Africa and spread into Asia.  I always wonder "how did they cross the Shatt-al-Arab?"  May as well have a boat!

It depends on what "early" means. Was it decades? Centuries, with them camped at relatively save locations until new generations decided on taking on yet another natural barrier to see what's behind or because they ran out of ressources?
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#10

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 11:10 AM)abaris Wrote:
(01-23-2020, 02:41 AM)Minimalist Wrote: I always smile when someone explains how early man came Out of Africa and spread into Asia.  I always wonder "how did they cross the Shatt-al-Arab?"  May as well have a boat!

It depends on what "early" means. Was it decades? Centuries, with them camped at relatively save locations until new generations decided on taking on yet another natural barrier to see what's behind or because they ran out of ressources?

Restless people led the way. One directions, SSDD, the other, UNKNOWN. I picture a scout walking in the new direction for a day. Spend the night. Come back with reports.
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#11

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 08:33 AM)SYZ Wrote: The Australian aborigines walked from Indonesia to the Australian land mass, and then to the island of Tasmania
when these three land masses were connected.  And they too originated in Africa.

There were lots of these land bridges 1000,000 years ago.

But those land bridges were hardly manicured country parks.  Marshes, streams, rivers, hills, valleys, underbrush, animals, insects, poisonous or otherwise, and, as G/S humorously notes above, there is always the possibility that you are intruding into some other group's hunting area.  Sure, you can walk across a land bridge.  But you can also paddle alongside it even easier.

These people were not stupid.  Surely one of them would have noticed that logs float.
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#12

The Peopling of the Americas
Yep, with crocagators and shit laying about in the shallows.
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#13

The Peopling of the Americas
Stop bringing your cousins into this again!
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#14

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 08:09 PM)Minimalist Wrote: Stop bringing your cousins into this again!

When it comes to my cousins I will happily hold their beer



in one hand and a camera in the other.
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#15

The Peopling of the Americas
Graham Hancock says people had been in North America up to 130,000 years ago. Heard that guy is shady though.
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#16

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 09:58 PM)Aegon Wrote: Graham Hancock says people had been in North America up to 130,000 years ago. Heard that guy is shady though.

Yeah, he's a sloppy thinker. If he told me the sun rises in the east, I'd wake up before dawn to double-check.
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#17

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-23-2020, 10:16 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(01-23-2020, 09:58 PM)Aegon Wrote: Graham Hancock says people had been in North America up to 130,000 years ago. Heard that guy is shady though.

Yeah, he's a sloppy thinker. If he told me the sun rises in the east, I'd wake up before dawn to double-check.

Fucking "Forbidden Archeology" goomba.
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#18

The Peopling of the Americas
Hancock is better at asking questions than answering them.
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#19

The Peopling of the Americas
He's only fairly good at making up shit.
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#20

The Peopling of the Americas
Hancock did make some cogent observations about what are obvious differences in building styles among certain Egyptian structures.  

The Osireion in Abados is credited by Egyptologists to Seti I because Seti built a temple in front of it.

But this is the masonry in the Osireion:

[Image: ty5a36dcc2.jpg]

and this is in the hypostile hall of the attached Temple of Seti I.

[Image: 131118_r24254.jpg]

Note the seams on the column in the photo of the young man as contrasted with the monolithic style in the first photo where a single block is twice the size of the man.  Also note the obvious lack of decoration in the Osireion as opposed to the ostentatious display on the columns of Seti.  Egyptologists simply ignore these differences.
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#21

The Peopling of the Americas
A stopped watch is right twice a day.
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#22

The Peopling of the Americas
While true that really doesn't answer the question.

Sometimes it seems as if the Egyptology crowd is far more interested in telling a coherent story than in examining the evidence.  Except for the coherent story part, they are a lot like republicunts.
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#23

The Peopling of the Americas
Insufficient documentation will get in the way. Egyptians were great for replacing names on monuments with their own.
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#24

The Peopling of the Americas
Wait, what? This is from the first link in the OP.

Quote:Dig sites near the coastline on Quadra Island, where sea levels 14,300 years ago were about 650 feet above modern-day levels. By 12,000 years ago, they were within ten feet of today’s. (5W Infographics; Map Sources: Hakai Institute, University of Victoria, Daryl Fedje, Keith Holmes)

The last time sea levels were higher than the current levels was more than 100,000 years ago. 14,300 years ago the northern ice sheets were receding and sea levels were rising rapidly. So how the fuck were sea levels on the coastline of Quadra Island 650 feet above modern levels?
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#25

The Peopling of the Americas
(01-24-2020, 12:27 AM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: A stopped watch is right twice a day.

Not always...

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