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(The More You Know)
#1

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Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Quote:There are several reasons we notice accents ‘disappearing’ in song, and why those singing accents seem to default to “American”. In a nutshell, it has a lot to do with phonetics, the pace at which they sing and speak, and the air pressure from one’s vocal chords.

For the specific details, we’ll turn to linguist and author, David Crystal, from Northern Ireland. According to Crystal, a song’s melody cancels out the intonations of speech, followed by the beat of the music cancelling out the rhythm of speech. Once this takes place, singers are forced to stress syllables as they are accented in the music, which forces singers to elongate their vowels. Singers who speak with an accent, but sing it without, aren’t trying to throw their voice to be deceptive or to appeal to a different market; they are simply singing in a way that naturally comes easiest, which happens to be a more neutral way of speaking, which also just so happens to be the core of what many people consider an “American” accent.

To put it in another way, it’s the pace of the music that affects the pace of the singer’s delivery. A person’s accent is easily detectable when they are speaking at normal speed. When singing, the pace is often slower. Words are drawn out and more powerfully pronounced and the accent becomes more neutral.
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#2

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(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Quote:There are several reasons we notice accents ‘disappearing’ in song, and why those singing accents seem to default to “American”.   In a nutshell, it has a lot to do with phonetics, the pace at which they sing and speak, and the air pressure from one’s vocal chords.

For the specific details, we’ll turn to linguist and author, David Crystal, from Northern Ireland.  According to Crystal, a song’s melody cancels out the intonations of speech, followed by the beat of the music cancelling out the rhythm of speech.  Once this takes place, singers are forced to stress syllables as they are accented in the music, which forces singers to elongate their vowels.  Singers who speak with an accent, but sing it without, aren’t trying to throw their voice to be deceptive or to appeal to a different market; they are simply singing in a way that naturally comes easiest, which happens to be a more neutral way of speaking, which also just so happens to be the core of what many people consider an “American” accent.

To put it in another way, it’s the pace of the music that affects the pace of the singer’s delivery.  A person’s accent is easily detectable when they are speaking at normal speed.  When singing, the pace is often slower.  Words are drawn out and more powerfully pronounced and the accent becomes more neutral.

I believe Elton John once answered a question similar to this, as in "why do you sing in that voice?" and he openly said that if he sang in like "British English" it wouldn't sound as good. 

"Losing EVERY-THAAAAANG, is like the SUN GOING DOWN ON MEEEEE"  Thumbs Up
"My fellow Americans, as a young boy I dreamed of being a baseball. But tonight I say we must move forward, not backward! Upward, not forward! And always twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom!!!" - Bill Clinton
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#3

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(12-03-2019, 12:45 PM)OakTree500 Wrote: "Losing EVERY-THAAAAANG, is like the SUN GOING DOWN ON MEEEEE"  Thumbs Up

That sounds like American Country music. Whistling
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#4

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One of the Beatles was asked why they sang with an American accent.

"We don't. You sing with a British accent."
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#5

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(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Quote:There are several reasons we notice accents ‘disappearing’ in song, and why those singing accents seem to default to “American”.   In a nutshell, it has a lot to do with phonetics, the pace at which they sing and speak, and the air pressure from one’s vocal chords.

For the specific details, we’ll turn to linguist and author, David Crystal, from Northern Ireland.  According to Crystal, a song’s melody cancels out the intonations of speech, followed by the beat of the music cancelling out the rhythm of speech.  Once this takes place, singers are forced to stress syllables as they are accented in the music, which forces singers to elongate their vowels.  Singers who speak with an accent, but sing it without, aren’t trying to throw their voice to be deceptive or to appeal to a different market; they are simply singing in a way that naturally comes easiest, which happens to be a more neutral way of speaking, which also just so happens to be the core of what many people consider an “American” accent.

To put it in another way, it’s the pace of the music that affects the pace of the singer’s delivery.  A person’s accent is easily detectable when they are speaking at normal speed.  When singing, the pace is often slower.  Words are drawn out and more powerfully pronounced and the accent becomes more neutral.

Exception to the rule.

Being told you're delusional does not necessarily mean you're mental. 
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#6

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(12-03-2019, 01:12 PM)brewerb Wrote:
(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Quote:There are several reasons we notice accents ‘disappearing’ in song, and why those singing accents seem to default to “American”.   In a nutshell, it has a lot to do with phonetics, the pace at which they sing and speak, and the air pressure from one’s vocal chords.

For the specific details, we’ll turn to linguist and author, David Crystal, from Northern Ireland.  According to Crystal, a song’s melody cancels out the intonations of speech, followed by the beat of the music cancelling out the rhythm of speech.  Once this takes place, singers are forced to stress syllables as they are accented in the music, which forces singers to elongate their vowels.  Singers who speak with an accent, but sing it without, aren’t trying to throw their voice to be deceptive or to appeal to a different market; they are simply singing in a way that naturally comes easiest, which happens to be a more neutral way of speaking, which also just so happens to be the core of what many people consider an “American” accent.

To put it in another way, it’s the pace of the music that affects the pace of the singer’s delivery.  A person’s accent is easily detectable when they are speaking at normal speed.  When singing, the pace is often slower.  Words are drawn out and more powerfully pronounced and the accent becomes more neutral.

Exception to the rule.


There are groups that sing to the public they want fame from...IIRC, ABBA was like that. And I like them.
I just believe in one less deity than most people.
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#7

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Yes.  Julie Andrews, who speaks with such a proper English accent, sings with an American intonation.  Well, she USED to sing.  After a throat operation the surgeon permanently damaged her vocal cords and she has never been able to sing since.  Can you imagine how horrifying that must have been for her?  Poor woman.
                                                         T4618
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#8

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(12-03-2019, 02:23 PM)Cavebear Wrote:
(12-03-2019, 01:12 PM)brewerb Wrote:
(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Exception to the rule.


There are groups that sing to the public they want fame from...IIRC, ABBA was like that.  And I like them.

Here are the words to the Louis Louis song......just in case you're wondering what the hell they're saying.  It should be sung in a Jamacian accent. 


Quote:Louie Louie, oh no, you take me where ya gotta go, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Louie Louie, oh baby, take me where ya gotta go

A fine little girl, she waits for me
Me catch the ship across the sea
Me sailed the ship all alone
Me never think I'll make it home

Louie Louie, oh no no no, me gotta go, oh no
Louie Louie, oh baby, me gotta go

Three nights and days I sailed the sea
Me think of girl constantly
On the ship, I dream she there
I smell the rose in her hair

Louie Louie, oh no, me gotta go, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Louie Louie, oh baby, me gotta go
Okay, let's give it to 'em right now

Me see
Me see Jamaica,…
                                                         T4618
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#9

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Ah, lip syncing...
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#10

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(12-03-2019, 04:57 PM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: Ah, lip syncing...

You got a problem with Milli Vanilli? Chuckle
I just believe in one less deity than most people.
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#11

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I wonder why it's so easy to hear various kinds of British (and American, Australian, Irish, etc.) accents in other kinds of music (show recordings, folk music, jazz), if the demands of singing necessitate American-style vowels.
god, ugh
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#12

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(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

I'd have to disagree with the article.  Aussie accents always come through with our vocalists.
To make the rash generalisation that we vocalise with an American or English accent is absurd.
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
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#13

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(12-03-2019, 10:57 PM)SYZ Wrote:
(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

I'd have to disagree with the article.  Aussie accents always come through with our vocalists.
To make the rash generalisation that we vocalise with an American or English accent is absurd.

You are correct.  The article is a steaming pile...
god, ugh
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#14

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Someone needs to send Billie Joe Armstrong a link to this thread.
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#15

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dual post
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#16

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(12-03-2019, 01:04 PM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: One of the Beatles was asked why they sang with an American accent.

"We don't. You sing with a British accent."

SOME famous singes sang with a cockney accent. Still love the song below








"Chas & Dave (often billed as Chas 'n' Dave) were a British pop rock duo, formed in London by Chas Hodges and Dave Peacock. They were most notable as creators and performers of a musical style labelled rockney (a portmanteau of rock and cockney), which mixes "pub singalong, music-hall humour, boogie-woogie piano and pre-Beatles rock 'n' roll".[1] --------"


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chas_%26_Dave
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#17

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(12-03-2019, 01:12 PM)brewerb Wrote:
(12-03-2019, 12:32 PM)Phaedrus Wrote: Why British singers lose their accents while singing

Quote:There are several reasons we notice accents ‘disappearing’ in song, and why those singing accents seem to default to “American”.   In a nutshell, it has a lot to do with phonetics, the pace at which they sing and speak, and the air pressure from one’s vocal chords.

For the specific details, we’ll turn to linguist and author, David Crystal, from Northern Ireland.  According to Crystal, a song’s melody cancels out the intonations of speech, followed by the beat of the music cancelling out the rhythm of speech.  Once this takes place, singers are forced to stress syllables as they are accented in the music, which forces singers to elongate their vowels.  Singers who speak with an accent, but sing it without, aren’t trying to throw their voice to be deceptive or to appeal to a different market; they are simply singing in a way that naturally comes easiest, which happens to be a more neutral way of speaking, which also just so happens to be the core of what many people consider an “American” accent.

To put it in another way, it’s the pace of the music that affects the pace of the singer’s delivery.  A person’s accent is easily detectable when they are speaking at normal speed.  When singing, the pace is often slower.  Words are drawn out and more powerfully pronounced and the accent becomes more neutral.

Exception to the rule.



This is why people sing it with an american accent.  No one knows what these lyrics might be. Catchy beat though.
"Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's. 
F. D.
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