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Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
#1

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
I didn't know that school assemblies were still compulsory. I sort of remember Thatcher's government enforcing it. Now the humanist society is starting a petition against them.

Tell the Government: replace compulsory worship with inclusive assemblies for all

Even better, they should been pushing not to have assemblies at all. They're a complete waste of time.
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#2

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
Mandatory assemblies in my high school were just a dramatic show for the popular kids to parade themselves in front of the rest of the school. A complete waste of time, yes.
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#3

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
I'm trying to remember if the secondary school I went to had them or not. Now I think about it, there were assemblies but they weren't overtly Christian. But then I can't remember what they were talking about anyway. They were probably doing the minimum they could get away with.
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#4

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
Our assemblies weren't religiously based. Just the football players and the cheerleaders doing their thing on the gym floor while the rest of us watched as though we didn't have better things to do.
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#5

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
The wonderful thing about UK's compulsory religious classes are how effective they have been in making UK Christian. Not.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/115167...k-religion
...
As many as 3,879 people have been polled for the British Social Attitudes report last year, highlighting how Britain’s spiritual identity has been reshaped since 1983. Among those surveyed, only 38 percent of Britons described themselves as Christian, down from 50 percent in 2008, just 11 years ago.
...

Snerk!
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#6

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
I had no idea they were still compulsory too. Fucking ridiculous. I guess it's because we don't have a separation of Church and state like America does.

And yet, ironically, we're still, overall, a much more secular country.
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#7

Compulsory Christian assemblies in UK schools
(08-02-2019, 09:15 AM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote: I had no idea they were still compulsory too. Fucking ridiculous. I guess it's because we don't have a separation of Church and state like America does.

And yet, ironically, we're still, overall, a much more secular country.

Sometimes the separation of church and state in the US is theoretical rather than real, particularly in the Bible Belt.

I went to a small rural school for middle and high school, and recall a couple of assemblies had low-grade religious content. There was also a thing called "release time classes" where with a parental permission slip you could be let out of school once a week for religious instruction nearby, typically in someone's home. Later in life I even developed fund accounting software for a non-profit that developed lesson materials for these classes. It wasn't allowed in all states, but it was non-controversial in many. While it was opt-in, most kids wanted their parents to sign the permission slip, or they would be perhaps the only one to opt-out and would have to be accommodated with a special study hall or something, which made you stand out socially and annoyed the school administration -- not to mention branding you as some sort of irreligious deviant. These "release-time" classes amounted to a Sunday School lesson basically. It got around separation of church and state by being "voluntary" and off school grounds.
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