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Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
#51

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
I believe there are signs that life started here more than once, making me suspect that life was inevitable here, or at least here.
  [Image: pirates.gif] Dog  
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#52

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
Mathilda had a nice theory that thermodynamics made evolution towards intelligence inevitable. I wish she would post on this subject.

@Mathilda
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#53

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
(07-11-2019, 08:08 PM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: They've found RNA precursors in space. Big hint.

Yeah, I wasn't saying that there aren't precursors of life in space. 

I'm saying that the odds of evolution of another planet producing intelligent life  similar to humans seems pretty small. Evolution is both random and directed. Mutations are random, but selection is directed by the aid or hindrance to survivability those mutations lend a creature in its own environment.

Given that, if we want to postulate alien life similar to humans, we have to postulate similar mutations having to interact with similar environments. We see even today how different mammals adapt to the same environs here on Earth.

Humans and octopi use the same DNA, but I don't think anyone alive will mistake one for the other. And that's just on one planet. Both species have developed good brains, good vision, and good mobility for their particular environs, but each species had to respond to its own selection pressures.

Now imagine those different branchings being influenced by the different environs of however many billions of planets. The odds that selection pressures would shape major aspects similarly would be pretty big. Two arms, two legs, and one head? Good luck.
<Insert intelligent thought here>
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#54

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
(07-11-2019, 08:14 PM)tomilay Wrote: I stand to be corrected by someone more versed in the subject, but evidence suggests abiogenesis happened once on earth. That suggests it has something to do with conditions on earth a couple billion years ago.  Conditions that have not occurred again. 

Not that this is a correction, but it seems possible to me that nascent protolife forms which may have further evolved into multicellular life might have been harvested as a food source for life that was already around. In other words, their abiogenesis may be cut short simply because even as protolife-forms, they represent energy that can be harvested by the already-living -- one branch of life having a head-start, you could say.

(07-11-2019, 08:14 PM)tomilay Wrote: Now if you extrapolate that with a different planet, different part of the galaxy(or even different galaxy), the probability of that confluence of events and processes is even less.

Yes. When there are no more-developed forms predating upon those nascent life forms, they are free from that particular selection pressure and it seems to me might be freer to assume very different forms.
<Insert intelligent thought here>
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#55

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
[Image: source.gif]
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#56

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
(07-11-2019, 09:53 PM)Minimalist Wrote: [Image: source.gif]

If they visited every million years or so then that would be right.
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#57

Are we alone? Bets are we're not.
(07-11-2019, 06:24 PM)Minimalist Wrote:
Quote: and we could very well be the most advanced life the universe has managed to "create".


Now THAT is one horrible thought!

[Image: 2782-e1508243200384.jpg]

WTF happened to George Carlin!? Huh
cetero censeo religionem esse delendam 
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