Welcome to Atheist Discussion, a new community created by former members of The Thinking Atheist forum.

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
#26

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
No. One lifetime is burden enough to carry and from my pov death isn't something to be afraid of.
The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
The following 6 users Like Szuchow's post:
  • Alan V, abaris, SYZ, Gwaithmir, mordant, GenesisNemesis
Reply
#27

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 05:13 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 02:21 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 12:25 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote: I am also an anti-natalist.

But don't you draw the distinction between "a life worth ending" and "a life worth continuing"?

No.   

The concept of "worth" isn't connected to my feelings about being born or being alive.   That concept may be meaningful for other people, but it's not to me.

I don't really mean "worth" in that sense.

I mean don't you think that there's a difference that matters between continuing a life and starting one? And between not starting one and ending one? (e.g. an absence of giving birth is not the same as a presence of death and to choose to not have children is not the same as to kill children).

Kinda similar to a difference between wishing some books weren't written or suggesting peope burned them.

It may be better that I wasn't born but now that I'm alive I'm having a hell of a good time so I want it to continue, for example. I think my life wasn't "worth" starting but is "worth" continuing. Not talking about self-worth or anything like that.
No, there isn’t a difference that matters to me in terms of this issue.   I am not an anti natalist.  I have no philosophical objections to reproduction.   

I have no control over my own or anyone else’s emotional reaction to being alive.  My basic emotional reaction is, no matter what my circumstances, that I would still rather not have been born.  That doesnt have any connection to my personal happiness or satisfaction or pain or goals or my ideas about humanity in general.  It does, though, connect to my feelings about whether I would want some kind of eternal  existence, which was the question of the OP.
god, ugh
Reply
#28

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I wouldn't mind living forever. Obviously would need some assurances. Don't want to be buried alive for 1000's of years, or things of that nature. But living normal life in a non hellscape environment sounds coolio. The alternative of not existing doesn't sound particularly interesting.
The following 1 user Likes jerryg's post:
  • EvieTheAvocado
Reply
#29

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 05:29 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:13 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 02:21 PM)julep Wrote: No.   

The concept of "worth" isn't connected to my feelings about being born or being alive.   That concept may be meaningful for other people, but it's not to me.

I don't really mean "worth" in that sense.

I mean don't you think that there's a difference that matters between continuing a life and starting one? And between not starting one and ending one? (e.g. an absence of giving birth is not the same as a presence of death and to choose to not have children is not the same as to kill children).

Kinda similar to a difference between wishing some books weren't written or suggesting peope burned them.

It may be better that I wasn't born but now that I'm alive I'm having a hell of a good time so I want it to continue, for example. I think my life wasn't "worth" starting but is "worth" continuing. Not talking about self-worth or anything like that.
No, there isn’t a difference that matters to me in terms of this issue.   I am not an anti natalist.  I have no philosophical objections to reproduction.   

I have no control over my own or anyone else’s emotional reaction to being alive.  My basic emotional reaction is, no matter what my circumstances, that I would still rather not have been born.  That doesnt have any connection to my personal happiness or satisfaction or pain or goals or my ideas about humanity in general.  It does, though, connect to my feelings about whether I would want some kind of eternal  existence, which was the question of the OP.

Ah ... I see.

So you're not against others being born ... just yourself personally. I get that part. It's a personal thing. So, yes, you're not an anti-natalist.

But why would it be regardless of circumstances? If your life was amazing why would you not want to be born then?
My Argument Against Free Will Wrote:(1) Ultimately, to control your actions you have to originate your original nature.

(2) But you can't originate your original nature—it's already there.

(3) So, ultimately, you can't control your actions.
Reply
#30

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 05:30 PM)jerryg Wrote: I wouldn't mind living forever. Obviously would need some assurances.  Don't want to be buried alive for 1000's of years, or things of that nature.  But living normal life in a non hellscape environment sounds coolio.  The alternative of not existing doesn't sound particularly interesting.

I wouldn't mind it, either. Indifferent to that.

Against anything hellish, though.

Also against anything even mildly painful if it's overall mildly painful rather than mildly pleasurable (and indifferent to non-pain and non-pleasure, of course).

Still don't really care if it's for forever or for 5 decades or for 5 years or for 5 minutes or for 5 seconds, though.
My Argument Against Free Will Wrote:(1) Ultimately, to control your actions you have to originate your original nature.

(2) But you can't originate your original nature—it's already there.

(3) So, ultimately, you can't control your actions.
Reply
#31

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 05:31 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:29 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:13 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote: I don't really mean "worth" in that sense.

I mean don't you think that there's a difference that matters between continuing a life and starting one? And between not starting one and ending one? (e.g. an absence of giving birth is not the same as a presence of death and to choose to not have children is not the same as to kill children).

Kinda similar to a difference between wishing some books weren't written or suggesting peope burned them.

It may be better that I wasn't born but now that I'm alive I'm having a hell of a good time so I want it to continue, for example. I think my life wasn't "worth" starting but is "worth" continuing. Not talking about self-worth or anything like that.
No, there isn’t a difference that matters to me in terms of this issue.   I am not an anti natalist.  I have no philosophical objections to reproduction.   

I have no control over my own or anyone else’s emotional reaction to being alive.  My basic emotional reaction is, no matter what my circumstances, that I would still rather not have been born.  That doesnt have any connection to my personal happiness or satisfaction or pain or goals or my ideas about humanity in general.  It does, though, connect to my feelings about whether I would want some kind of eternal  existence, which was the question of the OP.

Ah ... I see.

So you're not against others being born ... just yourself personally. I get that part. It's a personal thing. So, yes, you're not an anti-natalist.

But why would it be regardless of circumstances? If your life was amazing why would you not want to be born then?

I think my life is amazing enough.   I live in a beautiful house, in a beautiful state.  I have a wonderful husband (married 23 years today) and son.  I do work that I love and find meaningful.  I have met many cool people and traveled to lots of fun places.  While I’m depressed on and off, I’m also frequently happy, amused, engaged, etc.  None of that changes my basic feeling that I wish I hadn’t been born.  It is what it is.  Whatever the feeling that other people have when they talk about being happy to be alive, either I don’t have it or I haven’t been able to access it or label it.   I don’t beat myself up for it, just see it as a difference based on my combo of wiring and history.
god, ugh
The following 4 users Like julep's post:
  • Alan V, Tres Leches, EvieTheAvocado, epronovost
Reply
#32

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 06:08 PM)julep Wrote: I think my life is amazing enough.   I live in a beautiful house, in a beautiful state.  I have a wonderful husband (married 23 years today) and son.  I do work that I love and find meaningful.  I have met many cool people and traveled to lots of fun places.  While I’m depressed on and off, I’m also frequently happy, amused, engaged, etc.  None of that changes my basic feeling that I wish I hadn’t been born.  It is what it is.  Whatever the feeling that other people have when they talk about being happy to be alive, either I don’t have it or I haven’t been able to access it or label it.   I don’t beat myself up for it, just see it as a difference based on my combo of wiring and history.

Congrats on your anniversary! Thumbs Up

My life has always been interesting and nothing short of amazing and I value all the experiences, all the ups and downs.

Unlike you, I have moments when I think "it's good to be alive". Like stepping outside on a spring morning, with birds singing, flowers in vibrant colors and just the right temperature. I get this feeling of complete wellness and serenity.

Now, that my life gets closer to the end, I truly savor those moments.

But, yeah, it would be just as ok to never have been born.
[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
The following 5 users Like Dom's post:
  • julep, Tres Leches, EvieTheAvocado, Mark, Fireball
Reply
#33

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 06:08 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:31 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:29 PM)julep Wrote: No, there isn’t a difference that matters to me in terms of this issue.   I am not an anti natalist.  I have no philosophical objections to reproduction.   

I have no control over my own or anyone else’s emotional reaction to being alive.  My basic emotional reaction is, no matter what my circumstances, that I would still rather not have been born.  That doesnt have any connection to my personal happiness or satisfaction or pain or goals or my ideas about humanity in general.  It does, though, connect to my feelings about whether I would want some kind of eternal  existence, which was the question of the OP.

Ah ... I see.

So you're not against others being born ... just yourself personally. I get that part. It's a personal thing. So, yes, you're not an anti-natalist.

But why would it be regardless of circumstances? If your life was amazing why would you not want to be born then?

I think my life is amazing enough.   I live in a beautiful house, in a beautiful state.  I have a wonderful husband (married 23 years today) and son.  I do work that I love and find meaningful.  I have met many cool people and traveled to lots of fun places.  While I’m depressed on and off, I’m also frequently happy, amused, engaged, etc.  None of that changes my basic feeling that I wish I hadn’t been born.  It is what it is.  Whatever the feeling that other people have when they talk about being happy to be alive, either I don’t have it or I haven’t been able to access it or label it.   I don’t beat myself up for it, just see it as a difference based on my combo of wiring and history.

Ah, I see ... it's just an irrational feeling that you can't help due to depression. Despite the fact that, objectively speaking, you think your life is overall beautiful and amazing and your relationship is wonderful ... you still have that irrational depression (maybe you even have a depression diagnosis and it's a biochemical thing? None of my business of course ... so just ignore this if you don't want to comment on that).

In that case ... you sound like a very strong person, I'm glad you enjoy your life in spite of depression, and I'm sorry for misunderstanding! Heart
My Argument Against Free Will Wrote:(1) Ultimately, to control your actions you have to originate your original nature.

(2) But you can't originate your original nature—it's already there.

(3) So, ultimately, you can't control your actions.
Reply
#34

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
No one can live forever because in about 4 billion years the sun will die (4 billion years is a long time but not forever) personally I  couldn't bear being boiled alive on the remnants of earth or sucked into the vacuum of space and therefore floating around forever.
Justaminute    Salisbury steak...... A hamburger by any other name. 
The following 1 user Likes adey67's post:
  • Alan V
Reply
#35

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I don't see the attraction of never having been born. Every moment hasn't been filled with excruciating pleasure or interest but I could never choose nonexistence over what I've experienced. As I get closer to the jumping off place I don't find myself eager for it to arrive but neither do I begrudge its inevitability. But wish to live forever? I don't think that is even on the menu.
"Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's. 
F. D.
The following 1 user Likes Mark's post:
  • Vera
Reply
#36

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 06:54 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 06:08 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 05:31 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote: Ah ... I see.

So you're not against others being born ... just yourself personally. I get that part. It's a personal thing. So, yes, you're not an anti-natalist.

But why would it be regardless of circumstances? If your life was amazing why would you not want to be born then?

I think my life is amazing enough.   I live in a beautiful house, in a beautiful state.  I have a wonderful husband (married 23 years today) and son.  I do work that I love and find meaningful.  I have met many cool people and traveled to lots of fun places.  While I’m depressed on and off, I’m also frequently happy, amused, engaged, etc.  None of that changes my basic feeling that I wish I hadn’t been born.  It is what it is.  Whatever the feeling that other people have when they talk about being happy to be alive, either I don’t have it or I haven’t been able to access it or label it.   I don’t beat myself up for it, just see it as a difference based on my combo of wiring and history.

Ah, I see ... it's just an irrational feeling that you can't help due to depression. Despite the fact that, objectively speaking, you think your life is overall beautiful and amazing and your relationship is wonderful ... you still have that irrational depression (maybe you even have a depression diagnosis and it's a biochemical thing? None of my business of course ... so just ignore this if you don't want to comment on that).

In that case ... you sound like a very strong person, I'm glad you enjoy your life in spite of depression, and I'm sorry for misunderstanding! Heart

There are no rational feelings.  I would call it subrational, not irrational.  It is not a feeling due to depression.  However, I think we are veering far from the subject of this thread, so I’d prefer not to pursue it further here.
god, ugh
The following 2 users Like julep's post:
  • Dom, Alan V
Reply
#37

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 07:56 PM)julep Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 06:54 PM)EvieTheAvocado Wrote:
(01-27-2019, 06:08 PM)julep Wrote: I think my life is amazing enough.   I live in a beautiful house, in a beautiful state.  I have a wonderful husband (married 23 years today) and son.  I do work that I love and find meaningful.  I have met many cool people and traveled to lots of fun places.  While I’m depressed on and off, I’m also frequently happy, amused, engaged, etc.  None of that changes my basic feeling that I wish I hadn’t been born.  It is what it is.  Whatever the feeling that other people have when they talk about being happy to be alive, either I don’t have it or I haven’t been able to access it or label it.   I don’t beat myself up for it, just see it as a difference based on my combo of wiring and history.

Ah, I see ... it's just an irrational feeling that you can't help due to depression. Despite the fact that, objectively speaking, you think your life is overall beautiful and amazing and your relationship is wonderful ... you still have that irrational depression (maybe you even have a depression diagnosis and it's a biochemical thing? None of my business of course ... so just ignore this if you don't want to comment on that).

In that case ... you sound like a very strong person, I'm glad you enjoy your life in spite of depression, and I'm sorry for misunderstanding! Heart

There are no rational feelings.  I would call it subrational, not irrational.  It is not a feeling due to depression.  However, I think we are veering far from the subject of this thread, so I’d prefer not to pursue it further here.


Perhaps not but I find understanding what exactly you mean and why you feel that way is more interesting to me than whether anyone would like to live for ever or have super powers or some other nonsense.  Whatever you feel has the advantage of being real, however anyone's reason may evaluate it.
"Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's. 
F. D.
The following 1 user Likes Mark's post:
  • julep
Reply
#38

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
Two of my elderly friends died recently. They had so many physical ailments during the last ten years of their lives that death must have been a relief. I really don't want to live that long. I'm presently 70 and figure that I may have about ten good years left. That's enough for me. Consider
The following 4 users Like Gwaithmir's post:
  • Alan V, Dom, Thumpalumpacus, Dānu
Reply
#39

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
If Highlander has taught us anything, it's that living forever can be lonely and harsh [mentally I expect].

There is another movie, which I can't recall the name of, which about a man who lives forever and has to move every so often to avoid suspicion.
"Ah, we’re not going to church today. Fuck that. Ah, it’s all a bunch of bullshit. God’s everywhere, but I gotta go down there to see him? Really? And he’s mad at me down there, and I owe ya money? Go fuck yourself." - Bill Burr
The following 2 users Like OakTree500's post:
  • Alan V, mlmooney89
Reply
#40

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
No thanks. Eventually the joy of surprise must become so rare that it's nonexistent.

Not to mention the social reasons Abaris lays out.

The period at the end of this sentence helps give it meaning.
<Insert intelligent thought here>
The following 1 user Likes Thumpalumpacus's post:
  • SYZ
Reply
#41

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-29-2019, 10:03 AM)OakTree500 Wrote: If Highlander has taught us anything, it's that living forever can be lonely and harsh [mentally I expect].

There is another movie, which I can't recall the name of, which about a man who lives forever and has to move every so often to avoid suspicion.

Wolverine?
The following 1 user Likes jerryg's post:
  • OakTree500
Reply
#42

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-29-2019, 04:07 PM)jerryg Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 10:03 AM)OakTree500 Wrote: If Highlander has taught us anything, it's that living forever can be lonely and harsh [mentally I expect].

There is another movie, which I can't recall the name of, which about a man who lives forever and has to move every so often to avoid suspicion.

Wolverine?

hah! No it's some small indy thing, it's pretty much just a guy talking to his friends about his history and how he has to move to another state because he never gets any older. I'll look it up  Thumbs Up

EDIT: Found it, it's called "The Man from Earth"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_from_Earth
"Ah, we’re not going to church today. Fuck that. Ah, it’s all a bunch of bullshit. God’s everywhere, but I gotta go down there to see him? Really? And he’s mad at me down there, and I owe ya money? Go fuck yourself." - Bill Burr
Reply
#43

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I'd like to live until I'm done finding and solving challenging problems. 

For as long as there's something to learn and something to do, I'd like to be around to experience it.
The following 2 users Like Aliza's post:
  • Alan V, Jenny
Reply
#44

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-27-2019, 04:47 AM)Phaedrus Wrote: I suppose I enjoy the concept of immortality due to how it was romanticized by Anne Rice in her vampire chronicles. If you're the type of person who has never experienced the appeal of immortality through fiction, then of course you will be turned off by it.

Lol it's so funny how people can get different opinions from the same story. It is BECAUSE of Rice that I don't want to live forever. I read those novels as a teenager and decided I didn't want to ever have to keep trying to find new loved ones as the others die. Not even just the mortals died. Claudia died despite being a vampire and she was loved by Louis. Lestat's mom was another weird thing that made me shake my head no.

(01-28-2019, 01:30 PM)Gwaithmir Wrote: Two of my elderly friends died recently. They had so many physical ailments during the last ten years of their lives that death must have been a relief. I really don't want to live that long. I'm presently 70 and figure that I may have about ten good years left. That's enough for me. Consider

Just saying you have more computer skills that some 50 year olds I know and that means you are awesome.

(01-29-2019, 10:03 AM)OakTree500 Wrote: If Highlander has taught us anything, it's that living forever can be lonely and harsh [mentally I expect].

There is another movie, which I can't recall the name of, which about a man who lives forever and has to move every so often to avoid suspicion.

In the idea of moving every so many years to keep suspicion off there is also Tuck Everlasting and (don't judge) Twilight.

In addition in Highlander (another movie that taught me not to want immortality) there is also the silly movie Hocus Pocus where the teen gets turned into a cat that lives forever and he had to watch everyone he loved die too.
The following 4 users Like mlmooney89's post:
  • Alan V, Phaedrus, OakTree500, Gwaithmir
Reply
#45

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I think the only way for the mass population to be truly happy as immortals is if we 1) stayed young and fit and 2) our loved ones came with us. By everyone becoming immortal we take away the ability to live on Earth. Either we will over populate until we can't physically move or we will stop reproducing and will only have a certain number of the same people alive with us for the rest of forever. That would get old within the first millennia.

Other option is only you and your loved ones to live forever. That said do you get to have kids or are you part of your parents' inner circle? Do your kids get to have kids to give you grand kids? When does the circle close? Do your friends get to come with? What about their families? See it is never ending. If say it is the family you love now only would you be okay with everyone else you love growing old around you? I wouldn't.

TLDR No, immortality sucks balls.
The following 1 user Likes mlmooney89's post:
  • Alan V
Reply
#46

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
(01-29-2019, 04:53 PM)mlmooney89 Wrote: I think the only way for the mass population to be truly happy as immortals is if we 1) stayed young and fit and 2) our loved ones came with us. 

It would be so weird for our kids and grandkids to all grow as old as we are when we stop aging.   hobo
The following 1 user Likes Alan V's post:
  • mlmooney89
Reply
#47

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I've been avoiding this thread, as I didn't want to spend an inordinate time explaining myself, so I'll try to be brief.

Most traditional conceptions of living forever don't include the option of terminating your existence if you so choose. I'm not sure that's a deal breaker, but it would make me very hesitant if I didn't have that option. The more substantial problem I have is that, it seems plausible that, given human nature, for eternal life to be tolerable, much less pleasant, we would have to be substantially changed from what we currently are. Part of the pleasures of life require frustration, failure, and other negative experiences to exist in order for life to be meaningful. Without them, life would be difficult to imagine being worthwhile or ultimately satisfying, unless of course we were changed in some way that made the meaning and value of our experience not dependent upon these things. If we were changed in some such unforeseeable way, then I have no way to even form a valid opinion as to what that would be like and whether or not it would be desirable, as I have only the familiarity with the thing that I am to base my thoughts upon. So, I'm skeptical that eternal life wouldn't ultimately become intolerable for many of the possible reasons often cited, boredom, for example. On the other hand, I don't associate any necessarily unpleasant feelings about having lived 55 years, as opposed to 30, or 20, and if I live to be 80, or 100, I don't know that any significant difference in the amount of time existing, say between 20 and 100 years, will make much difference as to how I feel about living generally. Would that change at 200? 300? 1,000? 1,000,000 years? I don't know. Presuming I'm still relatively functional, and haven't changed significantly, I doubt I'd feel significantly differently about living one more year or several million of them. I don't see any backward glancing evaluation at 55, aside from wishing I didn't have to work harder at maintaining my health at 55 than I did when I was 20. So it's not altogether clear that I would necessarily be unhappy living forever. If I were given the option to terminate my life at any point, I'd sure be more than willing to find out.

In response to julep's post, I've never been glad to be alive, either, though feeling "okay" is head and shoulders above the way I felt most of my life up until this past summer, and that wasn't even talking about serious depression, just dysthymia. I neither wish to be alive nor wish that I was never born. I just have no feelings either way. I'm alive, and have no motivation to end my life. I suppose it's a side of my long history with Taoism. Things just are. That's neither good or bad, it just is.
[Image: ad_signature.jpg]
The following 4 users Like Dānu's post:
  • Alan V, Tres Leches, adey67, mordant
Reply
#48

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
Simple answer No i don't want to live in a heaven forever walking golden roads and everything being perfect - if it existed which i don't think it does for sure. 
Why would being alive forever be any different? Because it's not perfect like a heaven? no, maybe not but that concept is the same. Eventually you'll be so used to living and seeing things change and people argue and life grow that some of life may continue to be wonderful but won't you start feeling like everything's becoming mundane?
100 years, meh but eh 1000, get me out. 
I don't think i want to die because that idea is scary but i don't don't want to live forever either and being real i don't think the best solution for humans is to avoid death. 
Even conversations, i wouldn't want to know how many conversations would become repetitive, i live for difference i live for all my bad and good memories because they've taught me something i'd rather not see a day where i wake up and iv'e had them all.

-This is also a similar question iv'e been asked by christian family members who told me why wouldn't you want to go to a heaven? -
And i always replied the same way.
Reply
#49

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
I think Danu has the best and most balanced response so far, although most all of them are excellent.

If everyone had access to some practical method of biological immortality, such that you could live indefinitely with a good quality of life, and the only way you could die was by misadventure or personal choice, I'd be fine with that on the principle that it's nice to have choices and control. This fulfill's Danu's requirement that you be able to opt out at any time.

However, Danu also points out that we are not really creatures of eternity, but creatures of time. So living literally forever is in my view not something anyone would want in the long run. Some would feel that way sooner than others, but eventually, the time would come when you'd be utterly indifferent to new experiences.

As to what would have to change to fit us for eternity, I think hedonic tone would somehow have to be removed from the picture, or modified in ways I'm not creative enough to imagine.

I have no problem with ceasing to exist at some point. I do not fear or loathe it.

In many important ways, I am deeply tired of living here in the early part of my 6th decade, but a lot of that has to do with the short time and questionable health left to me foreclosing a lot of my options, and the expectation that I may well have to witness more sickness and death and suffering in people I care about. If I and my loved ones could choose to live as long as we wish with excellent physical AND mental health, sure, why not? So long as I can pull the plug on myself when I want to , that'd be fine.

I think it's possible that over the next couple of centuries such possibilities may present themselves to our descendants, and it will be interesting to see how they respond to it.

As for myself ... I hold onto my existence lightly and would feel content and un-cheated if I died in my sleep tonight. I make the best of each day I find myself able to enjoy and if my family history is any indication I probably have 20, maybe 30, maybe more years ahead of me, but if not, I'm willing to let all that be as it is.
Reply
#50

Would you want to live forever? Discuss.
Nope. Probably would go crazy eventually, and also assuming your body could be maintained for that long, everything else around you would dissolve and there'd just be darkness, which would almost be the same thing as death. You'd spend more time in that darkness than actually enjoying your immortality. I think there's a lot of utility in just accepting death.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)