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Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
#76

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
So much for shopping ones suicide abroad. Leastwise, one can't take for granted that what you do legally there will not cause your most helpful loved one(s) a big legal hassle. For fuck's sake.
"Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's. 
F. D.
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#77

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
(02-08-2019, 08:35 PM)Mark Wrote: So much for shopping ones suicide abroad.  Leastwise, one can't take for granted that what you do legally there will not cause your most helpful loved one(s) a big legal hassle.  For fuck's sake.

You can do it in the US.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brittany_Maynard

And she is not the only one by far. And there are people to help you. And it's all legal. And it won't even show as such on your death certificate.
[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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#78

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
Certainly a very moving—and brave—story framed with Btittany's own words, and at such a time of overwhelming illness.

But I was disgusted to read the fucking Vatican's response—both untimely and offensive to all involved.

"A top Vatican official mentioned her [Brittany's] decision to die in the context of reiterating the Catholic Church's position
on the right-to-die debate, noting that, "Suicide is not a good thing. It is a bad thing because it is saying no to life and to
everything it means with respect to our mission in the world and toward those around us."

How dare the Vatican—a hot bed of celibate, ignorant old paedophile enablers—make this sort of pronouncement as though
it's the sole global arbiter of ethics and morals.  Especially considering the sexual depravity of thousands of its priest across
the planet.

As far as I'm concerned, filthy old men who wear dresses, and who seriously believe as factual that some bloke was resurrected
after being dead for three days totally disqualifies them from having any right to comment about euthanasia or the right to die.
And if these hypocrites are genuinely [sic ] so concerned about people dying from terminal illnesses, then how come they don't
get their cunt of a god to intercede and heal them?

And yes; it does anger me.
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
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#79

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
The state where I live, Victoria, will become the first Australian state in the country to legalise assisted dying for the terminally ill,
with state MPs voting to give patients the right to request a lethal drug to end their lives from mid-2019.  

People choosing to access voluntary assisted dying must meet the following requirements:

1. They must have an advanced disease that will cause their death and is:

   likely to cause their death within six months (or within 12 months for neurodegenerative diseases like motor neurone disease) and
   causing the person suffering that is unacceptable to them.

2. They must have the ability to make a decision about voluntary assisted dying throughout the process.

3. They must also:

   be an adult 18 years or over,
   have been living in Victoria for at least 12 months,
   be an Australian citizen or permanent resident.

—The only weakness I can see in the legislation is that a doctor can refuse to prescribe and/or administer the lethal
drug based on religious and/or moral grounds.  Which probably means that most Catholic doctors won't conduct
the procedure, just as they won't carry out abortions.
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
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#80

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
(02-09-2019, 12:20 AM)SYZ Wrote: The state where I live, Victoria, will become the first Australian state in the country to legalise assisted dying for the terminally ill,
with state MPs voting to give patients the right to request a lethal drug to end their lives from mid-2019.  

People choosing to access voluntary assisted dying must meet the following requirements:

1. They must have an advanced disease that will cause their death and is:

   likely to cause their death within six months (or within 12 months for neurodegenerative diseases like motor neurone disease) and
   causing the person suffering that is unacceptable to them.

2. They must have the ability to make a decision about voluntary assisted dying throughout the process.

3. They must also:

   be an adult 18 years or over,
   have been living in Victoria for at least 12 months,
   be an Australian citizen or permanent resident.

—The only weakness I can see in the legislation is that a doctor can refuse to prescribe and/or administer the lethal
drug based on religious and/or moral grounds.  Which probably means that most Catholic doctors won't conduct
the procedure, just as they won't carry out abortions.

That's pretty much exactly the same as Oregon. Except I think you must only have been a resident of Oregon for 2 months, not entirely sure of that. There are a bunch of states in the US hat made it legal, and they each have their own laws. A lot more states have legislation pending.
[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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#81

Euthanasia: a good and gentle death
(02-09-2019, 12:20 AM)SYZ Wrote: The state where I live, Victoria, will become the first Australian state in the country to legalise assisted dying for the terminally ill,
with state MPs voting to give patients the right to request a lethal drug to end their lives from mid-2019.  

People choosing to access voluntary assisted dying must meet the following requirements:

1. They must have an advanced disease that will cause their death and is:

   likely to cause their death within six months (or within 12 months for neurodegenerative diseases like motor neurone disease) and
   causing the person suffering that is unacceptable to them.

2. They must have the ability to make a decision about voluntary assisted dying throughout the process.

3. They must also:

   be an adult 18 years or over,
   have been living in Victoria for at least 12 months,
   be an Australian citizen or permanent resident.

—The only weakness I can see in the legislation is that a doctor can refuse to prescribe and/or administer the lethal
drug based on religious and/or moral grounds.  Which probably means that most Catholic doctors won't conduct
the procedure, just as they won't carry out abortions.

You got so close, Victoria, but you didn't quite make it over the finish line.
Breathing takes too much effort.
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