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The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
#26

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
" The discovery of a fossilized fish may offer a glimpse into the day an asteroid hit the earth and wiped dinosaurs off the planet 66 million years ago, according to a new study. The 'exquisitely-preserved' fossils, some of which are of fish with hot glass in their gills, were found in North Dakota's Hell Creek Formation and are thought to have formed after an asteroid slammed into Mexico, causing flaming debris to rain onto the ground, according to a press release from the University of Kansas."

https://abcnews.go.com/US/discovery-foss...card_image
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#27

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
New species of early human found in the Philippines

"An international team of researchers have uncovered the remains of a new species of human in the Philippines, proving the region played a key role in hominin evolutionary history.

The new species, Homo luzonensis is named after Luzon Island, where the more than 50,000 year old fossils were found during excavations at Callao Cave."

[...]

"It's quite incredible, the extremities, that is the hand and feet bones are remarkably Australopithecine-like. The Australopithecines last walked the earth in Africa about 2 million years ago and are considered to be the ancestors of the Homo group, which includes modern humans.

"So, the question is whether some of these features evolved as adaptations to island life, or whether they are anatomical traits passed down to Homo luzonensis from their ancestors over the preceding 2 million years."

While there are still plenty of questions around the origins of Homo luzonensis, and their longevity on the island of Luzon, recent excavations near Callao Cave produced evidence of a butchered rhinoceros and stone tools dating to around 700,000 years ago.

"No hominin fossils were recovered, but this does provide a timeframe for a hominin presence on Luzon. Whether it was Homo luzonensis butchering and eating the rhinoceros remains to be seen," Professor Piper said.
"It makes the whole region really significant. The Philippines is made up of a group of large islands that have been separated long enough to have potentially facilitated archipelago speciation. There is no reason why archaeological research in the Philippines couldn't discover several species of hominin. It's probably just a matter of time."

Homo luzonensis shares some unique skeletal features with the famous Homo floresiensis or 'the hobbit', discovered on the island of Flores to the south east of the Philippine archipelago.

In addition, stone tools dating to around 200,000 years ago have been found on the island of Sulawesi, meaning that ancient hominins potentially inhabited many of the large islands of Southeast Asia.


“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#28

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"To come up with his measurement of the Hubble constant, Riess looked to some not-so-distant stars. Riess observed 70 Cepheid stars — stars that pulse at a well-observed rate — calculated their distance and rate, and then compared them with a certain type of supernovae that are used as measuring sticks. It took about two years for the Hubble telescope to make these measurements, but eventually Riess calculated an expansion rate of 74. Using that 74 figure means the universe is somewhere between 12.5 billion and 13 billion years old. That's much younger than the established estimates of 13.6 billion to 13.8 billion."

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/stud...r-62656475
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#29

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
I like it when multiple disciplines come together.

[Image: SBRT_Stereotactic_Body_Radiotherapy.jpg]
Being told you're delusional does not necessarily mean you're mental. 
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#30

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
While a young person, I saw this image. I instantly understood it and found it inspiring...
[Image: 34d8250361e4f6efa15a7194cc1a19a1.jpg]
It's one of the first images of an atom being smashed at the Brookhaven accelerator.
I still find it utterly thrilling.  
There are many similar images out there and I could look at them all day. Shy
________________________________________________
A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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#31

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(04-10-2019, 05:33 PM)Vera Wrote: New species of early human found in the Philippines

"An international team of researchers have uncovered the remains of a new species of human in the Philippines, proving the region played a key role in hominin evolutionary history.

The new species, Homo luzonensis is named after Luzon Island, where the more than 50,000 year old fossils were found during excavations at Callao Cave."

[...]

"It's quite incredible, the extremities, that is the hand and feet bones are remarkably Australopithecine-like. The Australopithecines last walked the earth in Africa about 2 million years ago and are considered to be the ancestors of the Homo group, which includes modern humans.

"So, the question is whether some of these features evolved as adaptations to island life, or whether they are anatomical traits passed down to Homo luzonensis from their ancestors over the preceding 2 million years."

While there are still plenty of questions around the origins of Homo luzonensis, and their longevity on the island of Luzon, recent excavations near Callao Cave produced evidence of a butchered rhinoceros and stone tools dating to around 700,000 years ago.

"No hominin fossils were recovered, but this does provide a timeframe for a hominin presence on Luzon. Whether it was Homo luzonensis butchering and eating the rhinoceros remains to be seen," Professor Piper said.
"It makes the whole region really significant. The Philippines is made up of a group of large islands that have been separated long enough to have potentially facilitated archipelago speciation. There is no reason why archaeological research in the Philippines couldn't discover several species of hominin. It's probably just a matter of time."

Homo luzonensis shares some unique skeletal features with the famous Homo floresiensis or 'the hobbit', discovered on the island of Flores to the south east of the Philippine archipelago.

In addition, stone tools dating to around 200,000 years ago have been found on the island of Sulawesi, meaning that ancient hominins potentially inhabited many of the large islands of Southeast Asia.



I heard they found about two dozen pairs of shoes with these fossils.  Whistling
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#32

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(03-13-2019, 01:47 PM)Kim Wrote: A big fishy embarrassingly washes up on a California beach.    

A Hoodwinker-sunfish washes up on a California beach and yes, hoodwinks everyone.  Nod

From what reading I've done, the sunfish family can be quite confusing to correctly identify.  Apparently, this guy isn't supposed to be in the northern hemisphere, at all.  Pretty steathy for a 7 ft fish to wind up on the other side of the planet.

Hey - maybe he's making a personal statement about immigration.   Wink

It was probably looking for a sanctuary city.
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#33

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
https://gizmodo.com/gravitational-wave-d...1834476177
So Cal Tech was playing in their Lego Lab, and look what they found ?
Oh wait, it's not the Lego Lab.
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#34

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Indian Ocean's Last Surviving Flightless Bird Repeats Evolution

"This remarkably uncommon process is classified as iterative evolution, a process in which the same ancestor evolves into the same species at different points in history.

A study published Wednesday reveals that the white-throated rail that inhabits the Aldabra Atoll in the Indian Ocean has repeated the 'course of evolution' after being wiped from existence some 136,000 years ago.
The bird's lineage originated in Madagascar, flew to Aldabra some 250 miles away, and likely remained on the island due to lack of predators. Another result of the newfound safety is that the bird evolved to become flightless.

A flood reportedly wiped the species from the island, but when land reemerged, another flock from Madagascar arrived and begin the 'course of evolution' again.

Researchers have found fossils of the bird from before and after the floods, both of which showed that the 'course of evolution' resulted in the bird losing the ability to fly."
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#35

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(04-27-2019, 02:21 PM)Kim Wrote: While a young person, I saw this image.  I instantly understood it and found it inspiring...
[Image: 34d8250361e4f6efa15a7194cc1a19a1.jpg]
It's one of the first images of an atom being smashed at the Brookhaven accelerator.
I still find it utterly thrilling.   
There are many similar images out there and I could look at them all day.   Shy

Funny, the first thing I thought was a Bach fugue: curlicues inside curlicues.
"What senses do we lack that we cannot see or hear another world all around us?" -- Frank Herbert
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#36

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
This is amazing. An image from the NICER detector.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/03/world/nas...index.html
Of course it detected moi.
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#37

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
The funny side of nature Shy

[Image: 1000.jpg]
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#38

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(05-03-2019, 05:33 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote: https://gizmodo.com/gravitational-wave-d...1834476177
So Cal Tech was playing in their Lego Lab, and look what they found ?
Oh wait, it's not the Lego Lab.

I can't imagine they knew how frequently they were going to detect something.
I see them sitting around, OK, it's on!
Time to go make some coffee....wtf was that?
And THAT!
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#39

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"Scientists led by Scott S. Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science announced the discovery of a dozen moons around Jupiter, bringing the total number orbiting the solar system’s largest planet to 79."

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/18/scien...moons.html
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#40

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(10-03-2018, 07:09 PM)Vera Wrote: Jary, a captive hornbill in Singapore, has been given a 3D-printed prosthetic bill after surgery to remove cancerous tissue.


[Image: _103682253_0636768e-2c62-46dc-a191-c23782bf7a10.jpg]

In July, staff at Jurong Bird Park noticed an 8cm gash on the 22-year-old male Great Pied Hornbill's casque and suspected the bird might be suffering from cancer.

Much of the tissue under Jary's casque had been destroyed by the disease.

The outlook was bleak - of two previous hornbill cancer cases at the park, one bird died after chemotherapy while the other's cancer had progressed too far for treatment.

Jary underwent a scan...


[Image: _103685281_mediaitem103685280.jpg]


... and a biopsy of the cancer-affected tissue was taken.

Analysis of the biopsy confirmed it was cancer and surgeons decided to remove all the cancerous growth.

A complete new prosthetic casque was printed for Jary.

Dr Hsu Li Chieh then removed Jary's casque with an oscillating saw.

Afterwards, dental resin was applied to the new casque to seal any gaps.

Jary's new casque has since turned yellow after he coloured it using pigment from his yellow tail, zoo officials say.

The bird was given the name Jary because it means "helmeted warrior" in the ancient Norse language.

Jary the hornbill was discharged from hospital in September. His prosthesis will remain until he grows a new casque.

[Image: _103686528_mediaitem103686137.jpg]


WOW! Am I right in thinking the full potential of 3D printing has not been anything like discovered?

Someone once wrote something like; To the ignorant  mind, technology seems  like magic. It does to my ignorant mind. --I was six when we got our first fridge, 13, our first b&w TV. I saw  a man walk on the moon, as it happened-ish. 

Although I began using computers for work (DOS) in 1982, and today use four operating systems, computers still seem like magic to me.   

I won't even start with  the magic of geriatric science over the last 60 years ---My grandfather died  at 74 in 1956, dad at 87 in 2006, and mum at 92, in 2019.  I'm cautiously optimistic about my possible longevity. I hoping for 80,  and still  compos mentis. 

Even though I'm an atheist  I  still appreciate the magic of my existence ,never taking it ,or tomorrow ,for granted .
 There's an old saying in Australia " Fair dinkum, I wouldn't be dead for quids"  Thumbs Up

Sorry to meander so far off topic. Please feel free to say so if this annoys you, and I'll  try not to do so in future
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#41

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Tidal turbines ... clean power.
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/08/27/tidal-tu...ter%7Cmain
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#42

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...Pa_OmJUfDs

Quote:This new study compared the stories of 625 individuals who reported NDEs with the stories of more than 15,000 individuals who had taken one of 165 different psychoactive drugs. When those stories were linguistically analyzed, similarities were found between recollections of near-death and drug experiences for those who had taken a specific class of drug. One drug in particular, ketamine, led to experiences very similar to NDE. This may mean that the near-death experience may reflect changes in the same chemical system in the brain that is targeted by drugs like ketamine.
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#43

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
It bubbles. Bubbles they say.
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/arch...at/598552/
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#44

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Friendly black holes.
https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/rotatin...ce-travel/
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