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The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
#1

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Jary, a captive hornbill in Singapore, has been given a 3D-printed prosthetic bill after surgery to remove cancerous tissue.


[Image: _103682253_0636768e-2c62-46dc-a191-c23782bf7a10.jpg]

In July, staff at Jurong Bird Park noticed an 8cm gash on the 22-year-old male Great Pied Hornbill's casque and suspected the bird might be suffering from cancer.

Much of the tissue under Jary's casque had been destroyed by the disease.

The outlook was bleak - of two previous hornbill cancer cases at the park, one bird died after chemotherapy while the other's cancer had progressed too far for treatment.

Jary underwent a scan...


[Image: _103685281_mediaitem103685280.jpg]

... and a biopsy of the cancer-affected tissue was taken.

Analysis of the biopsy confirmed it was cancer and surgeons decided to remove all the cancerous growth.

A complete new prosthetic casque was printed for Jary.

Dr Hsu Li Chieh then removed Jary's casque with an oscillating saw.

Afterwards, dental resin was applied to the new casque to seal any gaps.

Jary's new casque has since turned yellow after he coloured it using pigment from his yellow tail, zoo officials say.

The bird was given the name Jary because it means "helmeted warrior" in the ancient Norse language.

Jary the hornbill was discharged from hospital in September. His prosthesis will remain until he grows a new casque.

[Image: _103686528_mediaitem103686137.jpg]
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#2

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"Oh, what wonders you'll see!"  :thumbs_up:
  [Image: pirates.gif] Dog  
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#3

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(10-03-2018, 07:10 PM)Gawdzilla Sama link Wrote: "Oh, what wonders you'll see!"  :thumbs_up:


And the wonders that you'll print  :nodding:
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#4

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Seeing as I first saw this on the Elegant Nature of Science thread it seems only appropriate that it should find a home here again.

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#5

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
This one's an oldie but goodie from the NASA Advanced Concepts Lab, the people so far out there that NASA had to build them a separate facility.

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#6

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Tabular Icebergs.

Remember these when someone tries to use the old, "nature isn't about straight lines" argument. Wink

"Straight, geometric lines aren't uncommon in tabular icebergs, which tend to break along natural cracks and crevasses in the ice, a process accelerated by warmer temperatures as meltwater trickles into and widens the cracks."
________________________________________________
A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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#7

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
I think I'm going to try this is winter:

_____________________________________________________

A friend in the hole

"If we're going to be damned, let's be damned for what we really are." - Captain Picard

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#8

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
The largest structure on Earth is a termite colony. It consists of some 200 million mounds, some of which are as much as 4000 years old and are still inhabited. It's roughly the size of the UK.

Suck it monkeyspawn!
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#9

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
This is the only scale model of the solar system I could find online. Enjoy!
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#10

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(11-29-2018, 04:48 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: This is the only scale model of the solar system I could find online. Enjoy!

Cool.  I can't wait to see one for the Milky Way.   hobo
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#11

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(11-29-2018, 04:58 PM)Thoreauvian Wrote:
(11-29-2018, 04:48 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: This is the only scale model of the solar system I could find online. Enjoy!

Cool.  I can't wait to see one for the Milky Way.   hobo

LOL. I did the math. Since it takes around 20 minutes to view the entire map, it would take 139 days just to get to Alpha Centauri (a very close star) using a similarly scaled map. You couldn't traverse the Milky Way on a similarly scaled map in 100 lifetimes.

I recommend looking at the entire map for anyone who has the time.. It's kinda zen.
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#12

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(11-29-2018, 05:58 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote:
(11-29-2018, 04:58 PM)Thoreauvian Wrote:
(11-29-2018, 04:48 PM)vulcanlogician Wrote: This is the only scale model of the solar system I could find online. Enjoy!

Cool.  I can't wait to see one for the Milky Way.   hobo

LOL. I did the math. Since it takes around 20 minutes to view the entire map, it would take 139 days just to get to Alpha Centauri (a very close star) using a similarly scaled map. You couldn't traverse the Milky Way on a similarly scaled map in 100 lifetimes.

I recommend looking at the entire map for anyone who has the time.. It's kinda zen.

That's a whole lot of nothing.  You would get tired of all the Burma-Shave signs along the way.   Confused
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#13

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4x1084 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago


In total, the astronomers estimate, stars have radiated 4x1084 photons (a photon being the smallest unit of light). Or put another way: 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 photons.
“We drift down time, clutching at straws. But what good's a brick to a drowning man?” 
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#14

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"If the galaxy does in fact lack dark matter, that would paradoxically bolster the case for the material’s existence. Now the original team is back with additional evidence confirming their initial discovery, plus a newfound second galaxy that appears to show the same thing—or, rather, the lack thereof. Where once there was but one ultradiffuse galaxy seemingly free of dark matter, now, it seems, there are two."

https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...06601405=1
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#15

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(11-30-2018, 05:06 PM)Vera Wrote: Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4x1084 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago


In total, the astronomers estimate, stars have radiated 4x1084 photons (a photon being the smallest unit of light). Or put another way: 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 photons.

I'm pretty sure that the number is actually 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,042. Just sayin'. Big Grin
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#16

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"The magnetic north pole is currently shifting at the fastest rate in human history. Scientists say it might be a sign that Earth’s poles are about to swap places."

"Typically, Earth’s magnetic poles 'flip' — whereby all compasses invert and point south instead of north — every 300,000 years or so. But it’s been 780,000 years since the last flip."

https://returntonow.net/2019/01/29/nasa-...iFIA5ofyXQ
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#17

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
"More than 200 astronomers in 18 countries created a radio sky survey using the Low Frequency Array telescope, known as LOFAR. The first phase of this major survey was published this week, along with 26 research papers describing the results, in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. LOFAR is an incredibly sensitive radio survey, mapping the sky with fine detail. It's operated by ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy. For the first phase, LOFAR used low radio frequencies to observe about a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere's sky. Radio astronomy is another way of revealing the secrets of the universe that optical light can't. The radio signals of 300,000 [previously unknown] sources appeared, almost all of them galaxies. But researchers were also able to see black holes, to look at the evolution of clusters of galaxies and to measure magnetic fields."

https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/19/world/gal...index.html
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#18

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
Ok so, how do I get them to do gene therapy on me to reduce this CCR5 gene in my brain?  I promise not to take over the world with my new-found smarts.
Quote:Now, new research shows that the same alteration introduced into the girls’ DNA, deletion of a gene called CCR5, not only makes mice smarter but also improves human brain recovery after stroke, and could be linked to greater success in school.

Not quite sure what everyone's afraid of.  Is it that the human species might actually think it's way out of the shit we've gotten our planet into?   Maybe we could do with a few more fully functioning brains mixed into the gene pool.  
A bit late in the game for the human, considering we're the last of our species.

Hey, better late than never.   Deadpan Coffee Drinker
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#19

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
A team of researchers published results in Science yesterday that have produced synthetic "hachimoji" or 8-letter DNA. The synthetic DNA uses the 4 traditional nucleobases along with four novel nucleobases not used by living organisms. Hachimoji DNA can code for twice as much information as regular DNA and has been successfully transcribed into hachimoji RNA. The novel nucleobases can also substitute for one another and for regular nucleobases without distorting the DNA structure. This allows for mutation and evolution.

The synthetic DNA was produced to explore how life may have evolved on other worlds but has applications in diagnostics, nanotechnology, and information storage.
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#20

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(11-30-2018, 05:06 PM)Vera Wrote: Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4x1084 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago


In total, the astronomers estimate, stars have radiated 4x1084 photons (a photon being the smallest unit of light). Or put another way: 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 photons.

That's what, four hundred kajillion, right? Math was never my strong suit.
<Insert intelligent thought here>
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#21

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(02-22-2019, 07:27 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(11-30-2018, 05:06 PM)Vera Wrote: Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4x1084 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago


In total, the astronomers estimate, stars have radiated 4x1084 photons (a photon being the smallest unit of light). Or put another way: 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 photons.

That's what, four hundred kajillion, right? Math was never my strong suit.

4 -million-million-trillion-trillion-trillion-trillions* Peekaboo



*talking about real trillions (10^18) here not the fake american unit (10^12). If you are american, its quintillions to you.
cetero censeo religionem esse delendam 
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#22

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(02-22-2019, 06:34 PM)Paleophyte Wrote: Hachimoji DNA can code for twice as much information as regular DNA and ....
Great! That makes for some good news.....and some bad news.


Evidence for design!
Sady for incompetent design.
Luckily evidence for the christian god as designer, as evidenced by the repeated incompetence he showed throughout the course of the bible.
cetero censeo religionem esse delendam 
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#23

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(02-22-2019, 08:54 PM)Deesse23 Wrote:
(02-22-2019, 07:27 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(11-30-2018, 05:06 PM)Vera Wrote: Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4x1084 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago


In total, the astronomers estimate, stars have radiated 4x1084 photons (a photon being the smallest unit of light). Or put another way: 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 photons.

That's what, four hundred kajillion, right? Math was never my strong suit.

4 -million-million-trillion-trillion-trillion-trillions* Peekaboo



*talking about real trillions (10^18) here not the fake american unit (10^12). If you are american, its quintillions to you.

Yeah, a kajillion, just as I thought.  Smile
<Insert intelligent thought here>
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#24

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
(02-22-2019, 08:57 PM)Deesse23 Wrote:
(02-22-2019, 06:34 PM)Paleophyte Wrote: Hachimoji DNA can code for twice as much information as regular DNA and ....
Great! That makes for some good news.....and some bad news.


Evidence for design!
Sady for incompetent design.
Luckily evidence for the christinan god as designer, as evidenced by the repeated incompetence he showed throughout the course of the bible.

To be fair, abaci hadn't even been invented yet.
<Insert intelligent thought here>
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#25

The Elegant Nature of Science 2.0
A big fishy embarrassingly washes up on a California beach.    

A Hoodwinker-sunfish washes up on a California beach and yes, hoodwinks everyone.  Nod

From what reading I've done, the sunfish family can be quite confusing to correctly identify.  Apparently, this guy isn't supposed to be in the northern hemisphere, at all.  Pretty steathy for a 7 ft fish to wind up on the other side of the planet.

Hey - maybe he's making a personal statement about immigration.   Wink
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